Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/196023
Title:
Lab-on-a-Chip Optical Immunosensor for Pathogen Detection
Author:
Heinze, Brian Carl
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation develops technology for microfluidic point-of-care (POC) immunoassay devices, divided into three papers, and explores the use of a quartz crystal microbalance for real time monitoring of blood coagulation in a fourth paper. The concept of POC testing has been well established around the world. With testing conveniently brought to the vicinity of the patient or testing site, results can be obtained in a much shorter time. There has been a global push in recent years to develop POC molecular diagnostics devices for resource-limited regions where well equipped centralized laboratories are not readily accessible. POC testing has applications in medical/veterinary diagnostics, environmental monitoring, as well as defense related testing. In the first paper, we demonstrated the use of latex immunoagglutination assays within a microfluidic chip to be an effective and sensitive method for detecting the bovine viral diarrhea virus. In the second paper the feasibility and general ease of integrating liquid core optical components onto a microfluidic lab-on-a-chip type device, for point-of-care AI diagnosis is demonstrated. In the third paper particle agglutination assays, utilizing light scattering measurements at a fixed angle from incident light delivery, for pathogen detection are explored in both Rayleigh and Mie scatter regimes through scatter intensity simulations and compared to experimental results. In the fourth paper a quartz crystal microbalance was used for real-time monitoring of fibrinogen cross-linking on three model biomaterial surfaces.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Avian Influenza; Immunoassay; Microfluidic; Microparticle; Optical Detection
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleLab-on-a-Chip Optical Immunosensor for Pathogen Detectionen_US
dc.creatorHeinze, Brian Carlen_US
dc.contributor.authorHeinze, Brian Carlen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation develops technology for microfluidic point-of-care (POC) immunoassay devices, divided into three papers, and explores the use of a quartz crystal microbalance for real time monitoring of blood coagulation in a fourth paper. The concept of POC testing has been well established around the world. With testing conveniently brought to the vicinity of the patient or testing site, results can be obtained in a much shorter time. There has been a global push in recent years to develop POC molecular diagnostics devices for resource-limited regions where well equipped centralized laboratories are not readily accessible. POC testing has applications in medical/veterinary diagnostics, environmental monitoring, as well as defense related testing. In the first paper, we demonstrated the use of latex immunoagglutination assays within a microfluidic chip to be an effective and sensitive method for detecting the bovine viral diarrhea virus. In the second paper the feasibility and general ease of integrating liquid core optical components onto a microfluidic lab-on-a-chip type device, for point-of-care AI diagnosis is demonstrated. In the third paper particle agglutination assays, utilizing light scattering measurements at a fixed angle from incident light delivery, for pathogen detection are explored in both Rayleigh and Mie scatter regimes through scatter intensity simulations and compared to experimental results. In the fourth paper a quartz crystal microbalance was used for real-time monitoring of fibrinogen cross-linking on three model biomaterial surfaces.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectAvian Influenzaen_US
dc.subjectImmunoassayen_US
dc.subjectMicrofluidicen_US
dc.subjectMicroparticleen_US
dc.subjectOptical Detectionen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural & Biosystems Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairYoon, Jeong-Yeolen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCuello, Joelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWong, Pak Kinen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRiley, Marken_US
dc.identifier.proquest11324en_US
dc.identifier.oclc752261176en_US
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