Understanding semantic priming: Evidence from masked lexical decision and semantic categorization tasks

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/196017
Title:
Understanding semantic priming: Evidence from masked lexical decision and semantic categorization tasks
Author:
Hector, Johanna Elizabeth
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
There are now extensive behavioral and neuropsychological evidence to indicate that semantic information of a word can be activated without conscious awareness. However, semantic activation alone may not be sufficient for observing semantic priming effects in masked lexical decision task. In the following study, two tasks were used: lexical decision and semantic categorization. Conscious awareness of the prime was systematically manipulated by varying the duration of the prime and by varying the placement of the mask in the prime-target presentation sequence. Priming effects were observed in the semantic categorization task at prime durations of 42 milliseconds but no semantic priming was observed for the same prime duration in the lexical decision task. However, semantic priming effects began to emerge in lexical decision at the longer prime durations (55 & 69 ms) and under the least effective prime-mask presentation sequences. It is proposed that semantic activation alone is not sufficient for semantic priming effects in the lexical decision task but that central executive involvement is necessary, if only at the lowest level, for facilitatory effects to be observed. Furthermore, no such central executive involvement appears to be required for the semantic categorization task. The priming effects obtained in this task is interpreted in terms of a "decision priming" effect.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
masked semantic priming; lexical decision; unconscious processing; prime awareness
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Forster, Kenneth I.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleUnderstanding semantic priming: Evidence from masked lexical decision and semantic categorization tasksen_US
dc.creatorHector, Johanna Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorHector, Johanna Elizabethen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThere are now extensive behavioral and neuropsychological evidence to indicate that semantic information of a word can be activated without conscious awareness. However, semantic activation alone may not be sufficient for observing semantic priming effects in masked lexical decision task. In the following study, two tasks were used: lexical decision and semantic categorization. Conscious awareness of the prime was systematically manipulated by varying the duration of the prime and by varying the placement of the mask in the prime-target presentation sequence. Priming effects were observed in the semantic categorization task at prime durations of 42 milliseconds but no semantic priming was observed for the same prime duration in the lexical decision task. However, semantic priming effects began to emerge in lexical decision at the longer prime durations (55 & 69 ms) and under the least effective prime-mask presentation sequences. It is proposed that semantic activation alone is not sufficient for semantic priming effects in the lexical decision task but that central executive involvement is necessary, if only at the lowest level, for facilitatory effects to be observed. Furthermore, no such central executive involvement appears to be required for the semantic categorization task. The priming effects obtained in this task is interpreted in terms of a "decision priming" effect.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectmasked semantic primingen_US
dc.subjectlexical decisionen_US
dc.subjectunconscious processingen_US
dc.subjectprime awarenessen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairForster, Kenneth I.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGarrett, Merrillen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVan Petten, Cymaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1024en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137353554en_US
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