The Effect of Visual Context on Episodic Object Recognition: Age-Related Changes and Neural Correlates

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/196008
Title:
The Effect of Visual Context on Episodic Object Recognition: Age-Related Changes and Neural Correlates
Author:
Hayes, Scott Michael
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Previous research has investigated intentional retrieval of contextual information and contextual influences on object identification and word recognition, yet few studies have systematically investigated context effects in episodic memory for objects. To address this issue, unique objects on a white background or embedded in a visually rich context were presented to participants. At test, the object was presented either in the original or a different context. Chapter 2 demonstrated that a context shift decrement (CSD)--decreased recognition performance when context is changed between encoding and retrieval--was observed. In four studies with young adults, the CSD was not attenuated by encoding or retrieval manipulations. Chapter 3 revealed that the CSD was resistant to aging and neuropsychological status. Importantly, older adults classified as high MTL performed better on the recognition task than those classified as low MTL, and as well as young adults, supporting the successful aging hypothesis. Chapter 4 focused on elucidating the neural correlates of the CSD using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Right PHG activation during encoding was associated with subsequent recognition of objects in the context change condition. This same region was activated during recognition, suggesting it may automatically reinstate visual contextual information. Overall, the CSD is attributed to the automatic and obligatory binding of object and context information in episodic memory that results in an integrated representation, mediated by the hippocampal complex.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
memory; context; aging; fMRI; hippocampus; parahippocampal gyrus
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ryan, T. Lee
Committee Chair:
Ryan, T. Lee

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleThe Effect of Visual Context on Episodic Object Recognition: Age-Related Changes and Neural Correlatesen_US
dc.creatorHayes, Scott Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorHayes, Scott Michaelen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPrevious research has investigated intentional retrieval of contextual information and contextual influences on object identification and word recognition, yet few studies have systematically investigated context effects in episodic memory for objects. To address this issue, unique objects on a white background or embedded in a visually rich context were presented to participants. At test, the object was presented either in the original or a different context. Chapter 2 demonstrated that a context shift decrement (CSD)--decreased recognition performance when context is changed between encoding and retrieval--was observed. In four studies with young adults, the CSD was not attenuated by encoding or retrieval manipulations. Chapter 3 revealed that the CSD was resistant to aging and neuropsychological status. Importantly, older adults classified as high MTL performed better on the recognition task than those classified as low MTL, and as well as young adults, supporting the successful aging hypothesis. Chapter 4 focused on elucidating the neural correlates of the CSD using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Right PHG activation during encoding was associated with subsequent recognition of objects in the context change condition. This same region was activated during recognition, suggesting it may automatically reinstate visual contextual information. Overall, the CSD is attributed to the automatic and obligatory binding of object and context information in episodic memory that results in an integrated representation, mediated by the hippocampal complex.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectmemoryen_US
dc.subjectcontexten_US
dc.subjectagingen_US
dc.subjectfMRIen_US
dc.subjecthippocampusen_US
dc.subjectparahippocampal gyrusen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRyan, T. Leeen_US
dc.contributor.chairRyan, T. Leeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNadel, Lynnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGlisky, Elizabeth L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKaszniak, Alfred W.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1561en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137355925en_US
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