Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/196001
Title:
Shrinking Distance: Global Justice in a Globalizing World
Author:
Hassoun, Nicole Jolene
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
More than 2.7 billion people have less than US$2 a day on which to live. The world's 358 richest people have more money than the combined annual incomes of countries with 45% of the world's population. Traditionally social and political philosophy has focused on intra-national issues and institutions. But the fact that the world is becoming increasingly interconnected raises an important philosophical question: To what, if anything, are the global poor entitled? This book does two things. First, it argues that to be legitimate, the global institutional system must do what it can to enable people to meet some of their basic needs. Second, it considers which ways of altering the global institutional system might make it more legitimate.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
globalization; global justice; poverty; development; free trade; foreign aid
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Philosophy; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Christiano, Thomas D.
Committee Chair:
Christiano, Thomas D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleShrinking Distance: Global Justice in a Globalizing Worlden_US
dc.creatorHassoun, Nicole Joleneen_US
dc.contributor.authorHassoun, Nicole Joleneen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMore than 2.7 billion people have less than US$2 a day on which to live. The world's 358 richest people have more money than the combined annual incomes of countries with 45% of the world's population. Traditionally social and political philosophy has focused on intra-national issues and institutions. But the fact that the world is becoming increasingly interconnected raises an important philosophical question: To what, if anything, are the global poor entitled? This book does two things. First, it argues that to be legitimate, the global institutional system must do what it can to enable people to meet some of their basic needs. Second, it considers which ways of altering the global institutional system might make it more legitimate.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectglobalizationen_US
dc.subjectglobal justiceen_US
dc.subjectpovertyen_US
dc.subjectdevelopmenten_US
dc.subjectfree tradeen_US
dc.subjectforeign aiden_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhilosophyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorChristiano, Thomas D.en_US
dc.contributor.chairChristiano, Thomas D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGill, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGaus, Jerryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPollock, Johnen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2289en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659748141en_US
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