Diurnal Rhythms in Co-Sleeping Couples: Does Being "In Sync" Matter?

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195998
Title:
Diurnal Rhythms in Co-Sleeping Couples: Does Being "In Sync" Matter?
Author:
Hasler, Brant P.
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Subjective feeling, or mood, is not just a product of situational and dispositional factors, but is also based in part on underlying circadian rhythms. Notably, accumulating evidence suggests that circadian patterning is limited to positive affect, possibly as an adaptive manifestation of an appetitive motivational system. Furthermore, dispositional factors may influence the observed patterning, such as blunting the rhythm in positive affect when depression is present. The present study sought to examine further these phenomenon at an individual-level, as well as to explore circadian and affective interactions at a couple-level for perhaps the first time by monitoring mood, interpersonal interactions, sleep, activity, and light in 31 bed-sharing cohabitating couples over the course of 7 days. Participants' depression, well-being, relationship satisfaction, and morningness-eveningness were also assessed. Systematic daily patterning was found in all three measures of affect, and was moderated by depression, well-being, and morningness-eveningness. Within-couple affective synchrony (covariation) was positively associated with relationship satisfaction, within-couple morningness-eveningness similarity, and synchrony of sleep timing. Finally, day-to-day within-couple sleep timing synchrony predicted the tenor of the following day's partner interactions and affect. These data provide further evidence of potentially important interactions between sleep, circadian, affective processes both within- and between-individuals.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Affect; Circadian rhythms; Dyads; Mood; Sleep
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bootzin, Richard R.
Committee Chair:
Bootzin, Richard R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDiurnal Rhythms in Co-Sleeping Couples: Does Being "In Sync" Matter?en_US
dc.creatorHasler, Brant P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHasler, Brant P.en_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSubjective feeling, or mood, is not just a product of situational and dispositional factors, but is also based in part on underlying circadian rhythms. Notably, accumulating evidence suggests that circadian patterning is limited to positive affect, possibly as an adaptive manifestation of an appetitive motivational system. Furthermore, dispositional factors may influence the observed patterning, such as blunting the rhythm in positive affect when depression is present. The present study sought to examine further these phenomenon at an individual-level, as well as to explore circadian and affective interactions at a couple-level for perhaps the first time by monitoring mood, interpersonal interactions, sleep, activity, and light in 31 bed-sharing cohabitating couples over the course of 7 days. Participants' depression, well-being, relationship satisfaction, and morningness-eveningness were also assessed. Systematic daily patterning was found in all three measures of affect, and was moderated by depression, well-being, and morningness-eveningness. Within-couple affective synchrony (covariation) was positively associated with relationship satisfaction, within-couple morningness-eveningness similarity, and synchrony of sleep timing. Finally, day-to-day within-couple sleep timing synchrony predicted the tenor of the following day's partner interactions and affect. These data provide further evidence of potentially important interactions between sleep, circadian, affective processes both within- and between-individuals.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectAffecten_US
dc.subjectCircadian rhythmsen_US
dc.subjectDyadsen_US
dc.subjectMooden_US
dc.subjectSleepen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBootzin, Richard R.en_US
dc.contributor.chairBootzin, Richard R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAllen, John J.B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKaszniak, Alfred W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSbarra, David A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShoham, Vardaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10074en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659752097en_US
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