Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195997
Title:
Community Social Capital and the Health Care Safety Net
Author:
Harvey, Jennel Arlean
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation offers an empirical examination of the relationship between community social capital and health care safety net capacity. The ability and willingness of federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) and private physicians to serve the uninsured is crucial to ensuring that all Americans have access to a basic level of health care. Among other factors, this ability and willingness has been found to be a consequence of unique community values and traditions. This dissertation examined the extent to which the level of community social capital (community rates of participation in club meetings, projects, volunteer and civic activities) was related to three health care provider outcomes; 1) the willingness of private physicians to deliver uncompensated care; 2) the financial capacity of FQHCs to provide uncompensated care; and 3) the amount of FQHC resources directed toward the provision of largely uncompensated community-oriented services.Community and health care provider data on 1,248 FQHCs across 183 U.S. counties and 12,406 private physicians across 1,029 U.S. counties were collected from multiple data sources. Comprehensive multivariate analyses including Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA), Ordinary Least Square (OLS) and Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM), and a planned comparison was conducted on these data at the community ecological and individual provider levels of analysis.Based on a literature review and the theoretical components of social capital theory, I developed a conceptual framework that proposed a relationship among social context, institutional frameworks and organizational behavior. The dissertation research sought to determine the extent to which the social context in which the organization was embedded influenced organizational behavior.I found that the relationship between community social capital and health care safety net capacity was weak and the direction of the association mixed. Among the findings was a positive and significant relationship between civic participation and FQHC grant revenues. Unexpected findings included significant correlations between community social capital and Medicaid generosity, and social capital and uninsurance. Although the data analysis suggested that unmeasured factors were largely responsible for variation in safety net capacity, it raised interesting questions that provoke future study. Important implications for theory, policy and practice are discussed.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Social Capital; Health Care Safety Net; FQHCs
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Management; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Provan, Keith G.
Committee Chair:
Provan, Keith G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleCommunity Social Capital and the Health Care Safety Neten_US
dc.creatorHarvey, Jennel Arleanen_US
dc.contributor.authorHarvey, Jennel Arleanen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation offers an empirical examination of the relationship between community social capital and health care safety net capacity. The ability and willingness of federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) and private physicians to serve the uninsured is crucial to ensuring that all Americans have access to a basic level of health care. Among other factors, this ability and willingness has been found to be a consequence of unique community values and traditions. This dissertation examined the extent to which the level of community social capital (community rates of participation in club meetings, projects, volunteer and civic activities) was related to three health care provider outcomes; 1) the willingness of private physicians to deliver uncompensated care; 2) the financial capacity of FQHCs to provide uncompensated care; and 3) the amount of FQHC resources directed toward the provision of largely uncompensated community-oriented services.Community and health care provider data on 1,248 FQHCs across 183 U.S. counties and 12,406 private physicians across 1,029 U.S. counties were collected from multiple data sources. Comprehensive multivariate analyses including Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA), Ordinary Least Square (OLS) and Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM), and a planned comparison was conducted on these data at the community ecological and individual provider levels of analysis.Based on a literature review and the theoretical components of social capital theory, I developed a conceptual framework that proposed a relationship among social context, institutional frameworks and organizational behavior. The dissertation research sought to determine the extent to which the social context in which the organization was embedded influenced organizational behavior.I found that the relationship between community social capital and health care safety net capacity was weak and the direction of the association mixed. Among the findings was a positive and significant relationship between civic participation and FQHC grant revenues. Unexpected findings included significant correlations between community social capital and Medicaid generosity, and social capital and uninsurance. Although the data analysis suggested that unmeasured factors were largely responsible for variation in safety net capacity, it raised interesting questions that provoke future study. Important implications for theory, policy and practice are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectSocial Capitalen_US
dc.subjectHealth Care Safety Neten_US
dc.subjectFQHCsen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineManagementen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorProvan, Keith G.en_US
dc.contributor.chairProvan, Keith G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchlager, Edellaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGalaskiewicz, Josephen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1788en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747553en_US
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