CONDENSIN II CHROMOSOME INDIVIDUALIZATION IS NECESSARY FOR MEIOTIC SEGREGATION AND ANTAGONIZES INTERPHASE CHROMOSOME ALIGNMENT

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195995
Title:
CONDENSIN II CHROMOSOME INDIVIDUALIZATION IS NECESSARY FOR MEIOTIC SEGREGATION AND ANTAGONIZES INTERPHASE CHROMOSOME ALIGNMENT
Author:
Hartl, Tom A.
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Maintenance of an intact genome and proper regulation of the genes within are crucial aspects for life. The work of this dissertation has implicated the Drosophila condensin II complex in both processes. Condensin II's ability to reconfigure chromosomes into spatially separated and discrete units is necessary to ensure proper meiotic segregation. When this "individualization" activity fails in a condensin II mutant, chromosomes remain entangled, and either cosegregate or become lost during cell division. This leads to the creation of aneuploid sperm. We have also implicated condensin II as a factor necessary to individualize interphase somatic chromosomes from one another. This is relevant in Drosophila because the association of homologous chromosomes is thought to facilitate gene regulation activity in trans. We speculate that condensin II individualization spatially distances aligned chromosomes from one another and prevents this trans-communication between allelic loci. This is supported first by an increase of homologous chromosome pairing in a condensin II mutant background. Secondly, loss of condensin II leads to elevated production from alleles that are known to depend on pairing for transcriptional activation. These meiotic and interphase condensin II roles support its necessity to Drosophila genome integrity and transcriptional regulation. Given the conservation of condensin from bacteria to humans, it is likely that equivalent or related roles exist in a variety of species.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Cap-H2; Condensin; homolog pairing; meiosis; polytene; SMC
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Molecular & Cellular Biology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Bosco, Giovanni

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleCONDENSIN II CHROMOSOME INDIVIDUALIZATION IS NECESSARY FOR MEIOTIC SEGREGATION AND ANTAGONIZES INTERPHASE CHROMOSOME ALIGNMENTen_US
dc.creatorHartl, Tom A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHartl, Tom A.en_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMaintenance of an intact genome and proper regulation of the genes within are crucial aspects for life. The work of this dissertation has implicated the Drosophila condensin II complex in both processes. Condensin II's ability to reconfigure chromosomes into spatially separated and discrete units is necessary to ensure proper meiotic segregation. When this "individualization" activity fails in a condensin II mutant, chromosomes remain entangled, and either cosegregate or become lost during cell division. This leads to the creation of aneuploid sperm. We have also implicated condensin II as a factor necessary to individualize interphase somatic chromosomes from one another. This is relevant in Drosophila because the association of homologous chromosomes is thought to facilitate gene regulation activity in trans. We speculate that condensin II individualization spatially distances aligned chromosomes from one another and prevents this trans-communication between allelic loci. This is supported first by an increase of homologous chromosome pairing in a condensin II mutant background. Secondly, loss of condensin II leads to elevated production from alleles that are known to depend on pairing for transcriptional activation. These meiotic and interphase condensin II roles support its necessity to Drosophila genome integrity and transcriptional regulation. Given the conservation of condensin from bacteria to humans, it is likely that equivalent or related roles exist in a variety of species.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectCap-H2en_US
dc.subjectCondensinen_US
dc.subjecthomolog pairingen_US
dc.subjectmeiosisen_US
dc.subjectpolyteneen_US
dc.subjectSMCen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMolecular & Cellular Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairBosco, Giovannien_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChandler, Vickien_US
dc.contributor.committeememberParker, Royen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWeinert, Teden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTax, Fransen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10145en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659750710en_US
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