Las Tres Amigas: A Study of Biliteracy From Kindergarten Through Adolescence

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195970
Title:
Las Tres Amigas: A Study of Biliteracy From Kindergarten Through Adolescence
Author:
Arnot-Hopffer, Elizabeth Jane
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This is a longitudinal study that examines children's perspectives on the development of biliteracy. The theories of children as they learn through two languages reflect a crucial source of knowledge that has received little attention in the research. This study is concerned with the ways in which children learn to read and write in two languages for academic and social purposes as they encounter discourse laden with ideological contradictions.Using a case study design, the study draws on theoretical frameworks from the fields of language socialization, biliteracy, dual language education, and middle school literacy. By showing that children hold sophisticated notions of biliteracy, transforming the ways that language, oral and written become defined and perceived, the research presented here demonstrates that biliteracy is a complex phenomenon that includes meaning-making in two languages and cultures.The study triangulates ethnographic data from interviews with students, families and teachers, participant observation in classrooms, literacy instruction, other school domains, and document and archival analysis. These data indicate that there are multiple paths to biliteracy and that home and school literacy practices can mediate the effects of low income status on literacy development. Additional findings indicate that curriculum and instruction that consistently support minority language literacy promote the development of additive biliteracy in both language majority and language minority students.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Biliteracy; Case Study; Dual Language Education
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Language, Reading & Culture; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Moll, Luis C.
Committee Chair:
Moll, Luis C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleLas Tres Amigas: A Study of Biliteracy From Kindergarten Through Adolescenceen_US
dc.creatorArnot-Hopffer, Elizabeth Janeen_US
dc.contributor.authorArnot-Hopffer, Elizabeth Janeen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis is a longitudinal study that examines children's perspectives on the development of biliteracy. The theories of children as they learn through two languages reflect a crucial source of knowledge that has received little attention in the research. This study is concerned with the ways in which children learn to read and write in two languages for academic and social purposes as they encounter discourse laden with ideological contradictions.Using a case study design, the study draws on theoretical frameworks from the fields of language socialization, biliteracy, dual language education, and middle school literacy. By showing that children hold sophisticated notions of biliteracy, transforming the ways that language, oral and written become defined and perceived, the research presented here demonstrates that biliteracy is a complex phenomenon that includes meaning-making in two languages and cultures.The study triangulates ethnographic data from interviews with students, families and teachers, participant observation in classrooms, literacy instruction, other school domains, and document and archival analysis. These data indicate that there are multiple paths to biliteracy and that home and school literacy practices can mediate the effects of low income status on literacy development. Additional findings indicate that curriculum and instruction that consistently support minority language literacy promote the development of additive biliteracy in both language majority and language minority students.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectBiliteracyen_US
dc.subjectCase Studyen_US
dc.subjectDual Language Educationen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading & Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMoll, Luis C.en_US
dc.contributor.chairMoll, Luis C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGonzalez, Normaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReyes, Ilianaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGoodman, Yettaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2144en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747346en_US
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