Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195961
Title:
Hospice Interdisciplinary Team Processes and Effectiveness
Author:
Hale, Beth Ann
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this research was to test a causal model of interdisciplinary hospice processes and effectiveness. This research examined the impact of organization and team level structure constructs (organizational culture, team complexity, and team leadership) on hospice interdisciplinary team processes and subsequent influence on perceived team effectiveness. The relationships among perceived team effectiveness, team task satisfaction, and family satisfaction with hospice care were also examined.The sample consisted of 41 hospice interdisciplinary teams drawn from two hospice organizations in a southwestern city of the United States. Participants included 410 interdisciplinary team members and 32 hospice team leaders. Measures used in this research were adapted from instruments previously used in non-hospice settings. Data were collected through self-report surveys. Psychometric properties of all instruments were performed at the individual and group level. Psychometric properties of all but three scales (Hospice Organizational Culture: Group Culture, Hierarchical Culture, and Developmental Culture) exhibited reliability and evidence of validity as group measures.Four hypothesized relationships were supported, and six nonhypothesized relationships were significant in the model. All team processes except conflict management had positive direct effects on perceived team effectiveness. Perceived team effectiveness had a positive direct effect on team task satisfaction, and team task satisfaction was positively correlated with family satisfaction with hospice care in a limited sample. The proposed structural factors (hospice organizational culture, team complexity, and team leadership) did not impact hospice interdisciplinary team processes or team effectiveness. Approximately sixty-five percent of the variance in team effectiveness was explained by team hospice experience and team processes (leadership, communication, and coordination). Nearly fifty percent of variance in team task satisfaction was explained by the processes used for conflict management and perceived team effectiveness.Relationships identified in this research are viewed as preliminary. Future research should modify and re-examine model relationships with a larger sample drawn from diverse hospice organizations. In addition, structural variables influencing the hospice interdisciplinary team need to be re-examined for appropriateness and conceptual relevance. However, this study provided a foundation for understanding hospice interdisciplinary team processes and the influence of these processes on team and family satisfaction.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
hospice; interdisciplinary; team
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Nursing; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Verran, Joyce

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleHospice Interdisciplinary Team Processes and Effectivenessen_US
dc.creatorHale, Beth Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorHale, Beth Annen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this research was to test a causal model of interdisciplinary hospice processes and effectiveness. This research examined the impact of organization and team level structure constructs (organizational culture, team complexity, and team leadership) on hospice interdisciplinary team processes and subsequent influence on perceived team effectiveness. The relationships among perceived team effectiveness, team task satisfaction, and family satisfaction with hospice care were also examined.The sample consisted of 41 hospice interdisciplinary teams drawn from two hospice organizations in a southwestern city of the United States. Participants included 410 interdisciplinary team members and 32 hospice team leaders. Measures used in this research were adapted from instruments previously used in non-hospice settings. Data were collected through self-report surveys. Psychometric properties of all instruments were performed at the individual and group level. Psychometric properties of all but three scales (Hospice Organizational Culture: Group Culture, Hierarchical Culture, and Developmental Culture) exhibited reliability and evidence of validity as group measures.Four hypothesized relationships were supported, and six nonhypothesized relationships were significant in the model. All team processes except conflict management had positive direct effects on perceived team effectiveness. Perceived team effectiveness had a positive direct effect on team task satisfaction, and team task satisfaction was positively correlated with family satisfaction with hospice care in a limited sample. The proposed structural factors (hospice organizational culture, team complexity, and team leadership) did not impact hospice interdisciplinary team processes or team effectiveness. Approximately sixty-five percent of the variance in team effectiveness was explained by team hospice experience and team processes (leadership, communication, and coordination). Nearly fifty percent of variance in team task satisfaction was explained by the processes used for conflict management and perceived team effectiveness.Relationships identified in this research are viewed as preliminary. Future research should modify and re-examine model relationships with a larger sample drawn from diverse hospice organizations. In addition, structural variables influencing the hospice interdisciplinary team need to be re-examined for appropriateness and conceptual relevance. However, this study provided a foundation for understanding hospice interdisciplinary team processes and the influence of these processes on team and family satisfaction.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjecthospiceen_US
dc.subjectinterdisciplinaryen_US
dc.subjectteamen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairVerran, Joyceen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVerran, Joyceen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReed, Pamela G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEffken, Judith A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest2107en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747219en_US
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