Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195957
Title:
Snapshot imaging spectropolarimetry
Author:
Hagen, Nathan
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The research for this dissertation project began with the goal to construct a snapshot imaging spectropolarimeter forthe visible spectrum. The instrument integrates a channeled spectropolarimeter (CHSP) into a computed tomographicimaging spectrometer (CTIS), the result being an instrument that measures the complete spatially- andspectrally-resolved Stokes vectors of a scene. It is not the first of its kind, since a similar instrument has beenbuilt before for use in the short-wave infrared. However, that instrument encountered severe difficulties due tolimitations of available hardware. Visible spectrum work generally enjoys the best instrumentation available, providingan ideal place to attempt a proof-of-concept demonstration.The main body of the research is focused on finding ways to improve the CTIS measurement technique, especially in waysallowing it to integrate with channeled spectropolarimetry. The first effort is a careful analysis and reworking of thecalibration procedure for the instrument, followed by a survey and comparison of ideas for alternative CTIS designs.The second effort makes use of the new calibration approach to develop an alternative way of thinking about CTISreconstructions based on the geometry and physics of the instrument rather than on abstract matrix mathematics. Thisopens up ways to improve their accuracy and to achieve reconstructions at a much higher speed.Experimental results from the instrument illustrate the improvements obtained from using the new methods, showing itscurrent capabilities and limitations.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
spectrometry; polarization; spectropolarimetry; imaging spectrometry
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Optical Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dereniak, Eustace L.
Committee Chair:
Dereniak, Eustace L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleSnapshot imaging spectropolarimetryen_US
dc.creatorHagen, Nathanen_US
dc.contributor.authorHagen, Nathanen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe research for this dissertation project began with the goal to construct a snapshot imaging spectropolarimeter forthe visible spectrum. The instrument integrates a channeled spectropolarimeter (CHSP) into a computed tomographicimaging spectrometer (CTIS), the result being an instrument that measures the complete spatially- andspectrally-resolved Stokes vectors of a scene. It is not the first of its kind, since a similar instrument has beenbuilt before for use in the short-wave infrared. However, that instrument encountered severe difficulties due tolimitations of available hardware. Visible spectrum work generally enjoys the best instrumentation available, providingan ideal place to attempt a proof-of-concept demonstration.The main body of the research is focused on finding ways to improve the CTIS measurement technique, especially in waysallowing it to integrate with channeled spectropolarimetry. The first effort is a careful analysis and reworking of thecalibration procedure for the instrument, followed by a survey and comparison of ideas for alternative CTIS designs.The second effort makes use of the new calibration approach to develop an alternative way of thinking about CTISreconstructions based on the geometry and physics of the instrument rather than on abstract matrix mathematics. Thisopens up ways to improve their accuracy and to achieve reconstructions at a much higher speed.Experimental results from the instrument illustrate the improvements obtained from using the new methods, showing itscurrent capabilities and limitations.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectspectrometryen_US
dc.subjectpolarizationen_US
dc.subjectspectropolarimetryen_US
dc.subjectimaging spectrometryen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDereniak, Eustace L.en_US
dc.contributor.chairDereniak, Eustace L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKupinski, Matthewen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDallas, Williamen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJansson, Peteren_US
dc.identifier.proquest2317en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659748178en_US
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