Othering the Other: How Stereotypes Influence African American and Black African High School Students' Perceptions and Expectations of Higher Education

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195950
Title:
Othering the Other: How Stereotypes Influence African American and Black African High School Students' Perceptions and Expectations of Higher Education
Author:
Guy, Mignonne Catherine
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
For decades, researchers have sought greater understanding of the educational achievement gap between Blacks and Whites in the U.S. Past studies have concentrated heavily on K-12 attainment, and more recently on that of minority paths to higher education as well as obstacles to academic achievement. Often unnoticed are the interactions between social forces and the individual level psycho-social and cultural factors that may place a significant role; the stigmatization and resultant marginalization of Black students by negative stereotypes that classify them as intellectually inferior. This study explores African American and Black African highs school students' perceptions of negative stereotypes placed upon them through the conceptual frameworks of critical race theory (CRT) and the multidimensional model of racial identity (MMRI). Examining differences by immigrant status, this study seeks to uncover the intersection between the socially constructed images assigned to stigmatized groups differently influenced by negative stereotypes of Blacks and the subsequent influence on the students' perceptions and expectations of higher education. The narratives of this study illustrate the complexity of and interplay between external forces, minority youth social identities and pathways to academic attainment. This study finds that African American and Black African youth have multiple social identities that are not always reflective of the most accessible one of race. This study finds that salient social identities, personal or vicarious experiences of discrimination and being negatively stereotyped shape Black youths' individual aspirations and strategies for achievement. The present study calls into question the claim that Black youth process and respond to negative stereotypes of Blacks in a predictable manner and that these students respond to them independently of other social forces such as their families and communities in which they reside.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
achievement gap; african; african american; minority youth achievement; stereotypes
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Higher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rhoades, Gary
Committee Chair:
Rhoades, Gary

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleOthering the Other: How Stereotypes Influence African American and Black African High School Students' Perceptions and Expectations of Higher Educationen_US
dc.creatorGuy, Mignonne Catherineen_US
dc.contributor.authorGuy, Mignonne Catherineen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractFor decades, researchers have sought greater understanding of the educational achievement gap between Blacks and Whites in the U.S. Past studies have concentrated heavily on K-12 attainment, and more recently on that of minority paths to higher education as well as obstacles to academic achievement. Often unnoticed are the interactions between social forces and the individual level psycho-social and cultural factors that may place a significant role; the stigmatization and resultant marginalization of Black students by negative stereotypes that classify them as intellectually inferior. This study explores African American and Black African highs school students' perceptions of negative stereotypes placed upon them through the conceptual frameworks of critical race theory (CRT) and the multidimensional model of racial identity (MMRI). Examining differences by immigrant status, this study seeks to uncover the intersection between the socially constructed images assigned to stigmatized groups differently influenced by negative stereotypes of Blacks and the subsequent influence on the students' perceptions and expectations of higher education. The narratives of this study illustrate the complexity of and interplay between external forces, minority youth social identities and pathways to academic attainment. This study finds that African American and Black African youth have multiple social identities that are not always reflective of the most accessible one of race. This study finds that salient social identities, personal or vicarious experiences of discrimination and being negatively stereotyped shape Black youths' individual aspirations and strategies for achievement. The present study calls into question the claim that Black youth process and respond to negative stereotypes of Blacks in a predictable manner and that these students respond to them independently of other social forces such as their families and communities in which they reside.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectachievement gapen_US
dc.subjectafricanen_US
dc.subjectafrican americanen_US
dc.subjectminority youth achievementen_US
dc.subjectstereotypesen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRhoades, Garyen_US
dc.contributor.chairRhoades, Garyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMaldonado-Maldonado, Almaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDeil-Amen, Reginaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10681en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659753439en_US
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