Affect and the Structuring of Language Use in Ethnic Subcultures: A Study of Louisiana Cajuns

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195939
Title:
Affect and the Structuring of Language Use in Ethnic Subcultures: A Study of Louisiana Cajuns
Author:
Guidry, Tiffiny E.
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
I combine approaches drawn from sociology, social psychology, and linguistic anthropology to create a unique, novel framework for the study of language, culture, and affect. The social psychological concept of affective meaning in language is measured in a single, bilingual culture and applied to the study of bilingualism, language shift, and the transmission of culture through language. The data are collected from three generations of people identifying as Cajun in South Louisiana and a small comparative sample of elderly, non-Cajuns in the Southwest. Quantitative, affective data - collected from all study participants - are bolstered by qualitative video- and audio-based data collected using anthropology-based field techniques from Cajun French/English bilingual participants, oral family histories collected from middle-aged participants, and survey data collected from high school student participants. These data and personal accounts of lives, histories, and language conception and change provide the basis for answering the following research questions: 1) When using their different languages, do bilingual speakers hold different meanings for words that have the same translated meanings? 2) Can language shift be tracked affectively? 3) Does loss of language mean loss of culture? The answer to each of these questions is yes. It is my hope that the methods developed in this study will provide the basis for future language recording and analysis and cultural preservation projects.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
language; affect; subculture; sociolinguistics; cohorts; ethnic identity
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Sociology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Breiger, Ronald
Committee Chair:
Breiger, Ronald

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleAffect and the Structuring of Language Use in Ethnic Subcultures: A Study of Louisiana Cajunsen_US
dc.creatorGuidry, Tiffiny E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGuidry, Tiffiny E.en_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractI combine approaches drawn from sociology, social psychology, and linguistic anthropology to create a unique, novel framework for the study of language, culture, and affect. The social psychological concept of affective meaning in language is measured in a single, bilingual culture and applied to the study of bilingualism, language shift, and the transmission of culture through language. The data are collected from three generations of people identifying as Cajun in South Louisiana and a small comparative sample of elderly, non-Cajuns in the Southwest. Quantitative, affective data - collected from all study participants - are bolstered by qualitative video- and audio-based data collected using anthropology-based field techniques from Cajun French/English bilingual participants, oral family histories collected from middle-aged participants, and survey data collected from high school student participants. These data and personal accounts of lives, histories, and language conception and change provide the basis for answering the following research questions: 1) When using their different languages, do bilingual speakers hold different meanings for words that have the same translated meanings? 2) Can language shift be tracked affectively? 3) Does loss of language mean loss of culture? The answer to each of these questions is yes. It is my hope that the methods developed in this study will provide the basis for future language recording and analysis and cultural preservation projects.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectlanguageen_US
dc.subjectaffecten_US
dc.subjectsubcultureen_US
dc.subjectsociolinguisticsen_US
dc.subjectcohortsen_US
dc.subjectethnic identityen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBreiger, Ronalden_US
dc.contributor.chairBreiger, Ronalden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRagin, Charlesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSmith-Lovin Lynnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMendoza-Denton, Normaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2804en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659749856en_US
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