Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195930
Title:
After the Fire for Piano and Orchestra
Author:
Grogan, Charles Benjamin
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
After the Fire for Piano and Orchestra is musical composition of approximately 14 minutes in length. Many compositions of the 20th century feature experimentation with new patterns in musical language, the serial pitch structures of Schoenberg being particularly influential on later composers. As pitch language has become increasingly chromatic, composers are faced with the problem of organizing their compositions in a way that is intelligible to the listener. After the Fire for Piano and Orchestra is constructed using simple organizational elements to maintain continuity but still provide sufficient diversity in order to avoid the dense chromatic sameness found in many serialist and post-serialist works. Attention to every level of structure is necessary to create a well-designed composition. At the smallest level of the composition, motives are constructed out of the basic materials of the interval of a seventh and the octatonic scale and then those motives are transformed to create a variety of materials. At the middle level of structure phrases and phrase groups are constructed from the material created from the motives. However, the nature of the material at places sometimes makes it more suitable for a continuous type of construction such as fugal development or cadenza-like passages. At the largest level of structure further techniques of contrast are used to form the overall shape of the work. This contrast is made possible through the transformation of the motives into a variety of forms, yet the roots of the materials are the two basic elements of the interval of a seventh and the octatonic scale. The variety within the composition provides continual interest while the continuity ensures that the composition works together as a whole rather than as a sequence of loosely-connected episodes.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Degree Name:
D.M.A.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Music; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Asia, Daniel
Committee Chair:
Asia, Daniel

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleAfter the Fire for Piano and Orchestraen_US
dc.creatorGrogan, Charles Benjaminen_US
dc.contributor.authorGrogan, Charles Benjaminen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAfter the Fire for Piano and Orchestra is musical composition of approximately 14 minutes in length. Many compositions of the 20th century feature experimentation with new patterns in musical language, the serial pitch structures of Schoenberg being particularly influential on later composers. As pitch language has become increasingly chromatic, composers are faced with the problem of organizing their compositions in a way that is intelligible to the listener. After the Fire for Piano and Orchestra is constructed using simple organizational elements to maintain continuity but still provide sufficient diversity in order to avoid the dense chromatic sameness found in many serialist and post-serialist works. Attention to every level of structure is necessary to create a well-designed composition. At the smallest level of the composition, motives are constructed out of the basic materials of the interval of a seventh and the octatonic scale and then those motives are transformed to create a variety of materials. At the middle level of structure phrases and phrase groups are constructed from the material created from the motives. However, the nature of the material at places sometimes makes it more suitable for a continuous type of construction such as fugal development or cadenza-like passages. At the largest level of structure further techniques of contrast are used to form the overall shape of the work. This contrast is made possible through the transformation of the motives into a variety of forms, yet the roots of the materials are the two basic elements of the interval of a seventh and the octatonic scale. The variety within the composition provides continual interest while the continuity ensures that the composition works together as a whole rather than as a sequence of loosely-connected episodes.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.nameD.M.A.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusicen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorAsia, Danielen_US
dc.contributor.chairAsia, Danielen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDecker, Pamelaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWalsh, Craigen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10649en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659753428en_US
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