Economic Reform and the Comparative Development of Major Chinese Cities

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195921
Title:
Economic Reform and the Comparative Development of Major Chinese Cities
Author:
Green, Matthew
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
My dissertation is a comparative case study of the developmental trajectories of eight major cities within the People's Republic of China during the post-economic reform period of 1978 to the present: 1) Hong Kong, 2) Guangzhou, 3) Shenzhen, 4) Shanghai, 5) Beijing, 6) Tianjin, 7) Shenyang, and 8) Wuhan. Theoretically, I situate this study within the existing research on globalization and cities, most notably work on global cities or world cities, as well as research considering the impact of globalization on the nation-state. By documenting the economic and urban development of each city and analyzing data on various municipal-level indicators (e.g., population growth, foreign direct investment, political connectivity), I attempt to present the causal conditions explaining why some Chinese cities - Shanghai, Beijing, and Hong Kong - have developed into global cities, whereas other cities - Guangzhou, Shenzhen, and Tianjin - have adopted more secondary roles within the Chinese urban system. In addition, I aim to account for why more peripheral cities - Shenyang and Wuhan - have not experienced a comparable level of urban and economic growth. Particular consideration is given to how the development of each city during the post-reform period has been tied to the economic and political policy decisions of the Chinese central government, as well as the importance of political connections between municipal officials and state leadership for attaining global city status.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Sociology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Galaskiewicz, Joseph
Committee Chair:
Galaskiewicz, Joseph

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEconomic Reform and the Comparative Development of Major Chinese Citiesen_US
dc.creatorGreen, Matthewen_US
dc.contributor.authorGreen, Matthewen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMy dissertation is a comparative case study of the developmental trajectories of eight major cities within the People's Republic of China during the post-economic reform period of 1978 to the present: 1) Hong Kong, 2) Guangzhou, 3) Shenzhen, 4) Shanghai, 5) Beijing, 6) Tianjin, 7) Shenyang, and 8) Wuhan. Theoretically, I situate this study within the existing research on globalization and cities, most notably work on global cities or world cities, as well as research considering the impact of globalization on the nation-state. By documenting the economic and urban development of each city and analyzing data on various municipal-level indicators (e.g., population growth, foreign direct investment, political connectivity), I attempt to present the causal conditions explaining why some Chinese cities - Shanghai, Beijing, and Hong Kong - have developed into global cities, whereas other cities - Guangzhou, Shenzhen, and Tianjin - have adopted more secondary roles within the Chinese urban system. In addition, I aim to account for why more peripheral cities - Shenyang and Wuhan - have not experienced a comparable level of urban and economic growth. Particular consideration is given to how the development of each city during the post-reform period has been tied to the economic and political policy decisions of the Chinese central government, as well as the importance of political connections between municipal officials and state leadership for attaining global city status.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGalaskiewicz, Josephen_US
dc.contributor.chairGalaskiewicz, Josephen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGalaskiewicz, Josephen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRagin, Charlesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKenworthy, Laneen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11174en_US
dc.identifier.oclc752261028en_US
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