Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195908
Title:
Debris Disks in Open Stellar Clusters
Author:
Gorlova, Nadiya Igorivna
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Indirect searches for planets (such as radial velocity studies)show that their formation may be quite common. The planets are however too small and faint to be seen against the glare of their host stars; therefore, their direct detectionis limited to the nearest systems. Alternatively one can study planets by studying their "by-product" -- dust. We see raw material available for planets around young stars, anddebris dust around old stars betraying planet-induced activity. Dust has a larger surface area per unit mass compared with a large body; it can be spread over a largersolid angle, intercepting more starlight and emitting much more lightvia reprocessing. By studying dusty disks we can infer the presence of planets at larger distances.Here we present results of a survey conducted with the SpitzerSpace Telescope of debrisdisks in three open clusters. With ages of 30--100 Myrs, these clusters are old enough that the primordialdust should have accreted into planetesimals, fallen onto the star, or been blown away due to a numberof physical processes. The dust we observe must come from collisions or sublimation of larger bodies.The purpose of this study is to investigate the dustevolution in the terrestrial planet zone, analogous to the Zodiacal cloud in our Solar system. We are most sensitive to this zone becausethe peak of a 125 K black body radiation falls into the primary pass-band of our survey -- 24 micron. We investigate the fraction and amount of the infra-red excesses around intermediate- to solar-mass stars in open stellar clusterswith well defined ages. The results are analyzed in the context of disk studies at other wavelengths and ages, providing an understanding of the time-scale for diskdissipation and ultimately planet building and frequency.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
solar system formation; open clusters; debris disks
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Astronomy; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rieke, George H.
Committee Chair:
Rieke, George H.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleDebris Disks in Open Stellar Clustersen_US
dc.creatorGorlova, Nadiya Igorivnaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGorlova, Nadiya Igorivnaen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIndirect searches for planets (such as radial velocity studies)show that their formation may be quite common. The planets are however too small and faint to be seen against the glare of their host stars; therefore, their direct detectionis limited to the nearest systems. Alternatively one can study planets by studying their "by-product" -- dust. We see raw material available for planets around young stars, anddebris dust around old stars betraying planet-induced activity. Dust has a larger surface area per unit mass compared with a large body; it can be spread over a largersolid angle, intercepting more starlight and emitting much more lightvia reprocessing. By studying dusty disks we can infer the presence of planets at larger distances.Here we present results of a survey conducted with the SpitzerSpace Telescope of debrisdisks in three open clusters. With ages of 30--100 Myrs, these clusters are old enough that the primordialdust should have accreted into planetesimals, fallen onto the star, or been blown away due to a numberof physical processes. The dust we observe must come from collisions or sublimation of larger bodies.The purpose of this study is to investigate the dustevolution in the terrestrial planet zone, analogous to the Zodiacal cloud in our Solar system. We are most sensitive to this zone becausethe peak of a 125 K black body radiation falls into the primary pass-band of our survey -- 24 micron. We investigate the fraction and amount of the infra-red excesses around intermediate- to solar-mass stars in open stellar clusterswith well defined ages. The results are analyzed in the context of disk studies at other wavelengths and ages, providing an understanding of the time-scale for diskdissipation and ultimately planet building and frequency.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectsolar system formationen_US
dc.subjectopen clustersen_US
dc.subjectdebris disksen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAstronomyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRieke, George H.en_US
dc.contributor.chairRieke, George H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMalhotra, Renuen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMeyer, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMuzerolle, Jamesen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1841en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659746387en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.