The Genetic Basis of Reproductive Isolation Between Two Species of House Mice

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195901
Title:
The Genetic Basis of Reproductive Isolation Between Two Species of House Mice
Author:
Good, Jeffrey
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Determining the genetic basis of reproductive isolation is a fundamental goal in evolutionary biology. Intrinsic reproductive isolation often arises due to epistasis between divergent interacting genes. The rapid evolution of hybrid male sterility is known to have several causes, including the exposure of recessive X-linked incompatibilities in males and the rapid evolution of male reproductive traits. Despite these insights, little is known about the genetics of reproductive isolation during the early stages of speciation. This deficiency inspired parallel studies on the molecular evolution of male reproduction in house mice and the genetic basis of hybrid male sterility between two mouse species, Mus domesticus and M. musculus. Evolutionary analysis of 946 genes showed that the intensity of positive selection varies across sperm development and acts primarily on phenotypes that develop late in spermatogenesis (Appendix A). Several reciprocal crosses between wild-derived strains of M. musculus and M. domesticus were used to examine F1 hybrid male sterility (Appendix B). These crosses revealed hybrid male sterility linked to the M. musculus X chromosome and a novel sterility polymorphism within M. musculus. A large introgression experiment was used to further dissect the genetic basis of X-linked incompatibilities between M. musculus and M. domesticus (Appendix C). Introgression of the M. musculus X chromosome into a M. domesticus genetic background produced male sterility and involved a minimum of four factors. No sterility factors were uncovered on the M. domesticus X chromosome. These data demonstrate the complex genetic basis of hybrid sterility in mice and provide numerous X-linked candidate sterility genes. The molecular evolution of five rapidly evolving candidate genes was examined using population and phylogenetic sampling in Mus (Appendix D). Four of these loci showed evidence of positive natural selection. One locus, 4933436I01Rik, showed divergent protein evolution between M. domesticus and M. musculus and was one of a handful of testis-expressed genes within a narrow interval involved in hybrid male sterility. In summary, these data demonstrate that hybrid male sterility has a complex genetic basis between two closely related species of house mice and provide a foundation for the identification of specific mutations that isolate these species.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
speciation; epistasis; hybrid male sterility; house mice; spermatogenesis; positive selection
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Ecology & Evolutionary Biology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nachman, Michael W.
Committee Chair:
Nachman, Michael W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleThe Genetic Basis of Reproductive Isolation Between Two Species of House Miceen_US
dc.creatorGood, Jeffreyen_US
dc.contributor.authorGood, Jeffreyen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDetermining the genetic basis of reproductive isolation is a fundamental goal in evolutionary biology. Intrinsic reproductive isolation often arises due to epistasis between divergent interacting genes. The rapid evolution of hybrid male sterility is known to have several causes, including the exposure of recessive X-linked incompatibilities in males and the rapid evolution of male reproductive traits. Despite these insights, little is known about the genetics of reproductive isolation during the early stages of speciation. This deficiency inspired parallel studies on the molecular evolution of male reproduction in house mice and the genetic basis of hybrid male sterility between two mouse species, Mus domesticus and M. musculus. Evolutionary analysis of 946 genes showed that the intensity of positive selection varies across sperm development and acts primarily on phenotypes that develop late in spermatogenesis (Appendix A). Several reciprocal crosses between wild-derived strains of M. musculus and M. domesticus were used to examine F1 hybrid male sterility (Appendix B). These crosses revealed hybrid male sterility linked to the M. musculus X chromosome and a novel sterility polymorphism within M. musculus. A large introgression experiment was used to further dissect the genetic basis of X-linked incompatibilities between M. musculus and M. domesticus (Appendix C). Introgression of the M. musculus X chromosome into a M. domesticus genetic background produced male sterility and involved a minimum of four factors. No sterility factors were uncovered on the M. domesticus X chromosome. These data demonstrate the complex genetic basis of hybrid sterility in mice and provide numerous X-linked candidate sterility genes. The molecular evolution of five rapidly evolving candidate genes was examined using population and phylogenetic sampling in Mus (Appendix D). Four of these loci showed evidence of positive natural selection. One locus, 4933436I01Rik, showed divergent protein evolution between M. domesticus and M. musculus and was one of a handful of testis-expressed genes within a narrow interval involved in hybrid male sterility. In summary, these data demonstrate that hybrid male sterility has a complex genetic basis between two closely related species of house mice and provide a foundation for the identification of specific mutations that isolate these species.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectspeciationen_US
dc.subjectepistasisen_US
dc.subjecthybrid male sterilityen_US
dc.subjecthouse miceen_US
dc.subjectspermatogenesisen_US
dc.subjectpositive selectionen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEcology & Evolutionary Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNachman, Michael W.en_US
dc.contributor.chairNachman, Michael W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNachman, Michael W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMachado, Carlos A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMarkow, Therese A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest2439en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659748445en_US
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