Tele-Visiones (Tele-Visions): The Making of Mexican Television News, 1950-1970

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195895
Title:
Tele-Visiones (Tele-Visions): The Making of Mexican Television News, 1950-1970
Author:
Gonzalez de Bustamante, Celestine
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Between 1950 and 1970 television emerged as one of the most important forms of mass communication in Mexico. An analysis of television news scripts and film clips located at the Televisa (the nation’s largest television network) Archives in Mexico City exposed tensions and traditions in television news. The tensions reveal conflicts between: the government and media producers; modernity and the desire to create traditions and maintain those already invented; elite controllers of the media and popular viewers; a male dominated business and female news producers and viewers; an elite (mostly white) group of media moguls and a poor mestizo and indigenous viewers; and the United States and Mexico in the midst of the Cold War. In contrast to the trend in scholarship on Mexican television, this dissertation demonstrates that media executives such as Emilio Azcárrraga Milmo and high ranking government officials within the Partido Revolucionario Institucional (PRI) maintained close connections, but the two groups did not always walk in lock-step. Analysis of newscast scripts and film clips located at Televisa’s (Mexico’s largest network) Archive reveal a more complex picture, which shows there were several and sometimes competing visions for the country's future. Examining the first twenty years of television news in Mexico City, the author focuses on production, content, and interpretations of the news. The dissertation finds evidence to prove that news producers and writers formed tele-traditions that influenced news production, content, and interpretation well into the 1980s. Unprecedented access to Televisa Archives allowed the author to ask and answer questions, that to date scholars have not treated, such as, what makes Mexican television news Mexican? The dissertation is grounded in a theoretical framework called hybridity of framing, which combines the concepts of cultural hybridity and news framing. The dissertation concludes that although news producers and writers attempted to frame events in certain ways, viewers often interpreted the news differently.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
mexican television; mexican television news; mexico history
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
History; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Beezley, William H.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleTele-Visiones (Tele-Visions): The Making of Mexican Television News, 1950-1970en_US
dc.creatorGonzalez de Bustamante, Celestineen_US
dc.contributor.authorGonzalez de Bustamante, Celestineen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractBetween 1950 and 1970 television emerged as one of the most important forms of mass communication in Mexico. An analysis of television news scripts and film clips located at the Televisa (the nation’s largest television network) Archives in Mexico City exposed tensions and traditions in television news. The tensions reveal conflicts between: the government and media producers; modernity and the desire to create traditions and maintain those already invented; elite controllers of the media and popular viewers; a male dominated business and female news producers and viewers; an elite (mostly white) group of media moguls and a poor mestizo and indigenous viewers; and the United States and Mexico in the midst of the Cold War. In contrast to the trend in scholarship on Mexican television, this dissertation demonstrates that media executives such as Emilio Azcárrraga Milmo and high ranking government officials within the Partido Revolucionario Institucional (PRI) maintained close connections, but the two groups did not always walk in lock-step. Analysis of newscast scripts and film clips located at Televisa’s (Mexico’s largest network) Archive reveal a more complex picture, which shows there were several and sometimes competing visions for the country's future. Examining the first twenty years of television news in Mexico City, the author focuses on production, content, and interpretations of the news. The dissertation finds evidence to prove that news producers and writers formed tele-traditions that influenced news production, content, and interpretation well into the 1980s. Unprecedented access to Televisa Archives allowed the author to ask and answer questions, that to date scholars have not treated, such as, what makes Mexican television news Mexican? The dissertation is grounded in a theoretical framework called hybridity of framing, which combines the concepts of cultural hybridity and news framing. The dissertation concludes that although news producers and writers attempted to frame events in certain ways, viewers often interpreted the news differently.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectmexican televisionen_US
dc.subjectmexican television newsen_US
dc.subjectmexico historyen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairBeezley, William H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBarickman, Bert J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSharkey, Jacquelineen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1559en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137355912en_US
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