Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195891
Title:
Quasioptical Systems & Components for Terahertz Astronomy
Author:
Golish, Dathon R
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Over the past two decades, submillimeter and terahertz astronomy has grown rapidly and become an important new window for studying the universe. This growth has been enabled by the confluence of several technologies which make the design and fabrication of high frequency single and multi-pixel heterodyne receivers possible. This dissertation reviews the development of a new generation of terahertz instrumentation at the University of Arizona, with specific emphasis on their optical components and systems. These instruments include several receivers for the Antarctic Submillimeter Telescope and Remote Observatory (formerly installed at the South Pole), including a dual-frequency 492/810 GHz receiver called Wanda, a 4-pixel 810 GHz heterodyne array called PoleSTAR, and a 1.5 THz receiver called TREND. It also covers receivers for the Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope on Mt. Graham in southern Arizona. These receivers include a 7-pixel 345 GHz heterodyne array called DesertSTAR, a 64-pixel polarimeter/bolometer system called Hertz, and a 64-pixel 345 GHz heterodyne array called SuperCam. After reviewing these instruments, concepts for the next generation of arrays and terahertz telescopes designed for the high Atacama desert, Antarctica, high altitude balloon missions, and orbiting observatories will be presented. This dissertation will also cover other contributions made to terahertz astronomy, including the creation of a Gaussian beam propagation program to help design terahertz optical systems and an integrated optics design for a waveguide interferometer to be used as an alternative to traditional bulk optics systems.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Optical Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Walker, Christopher K
Committee Chair:
Walker, Christopher K

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleQuasioptical Systems & Components for Terahertz Astronomyen_US
dc.creatorGolish, Dathon Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorGolish, Dathon Ren_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOver the past two decades, submillimeter and terahertz astronomy has grown rapidly and become an important new window for studying the universe. This growth has been enabled by the confluence of several technologies which make the design and fabrication of high frequency single and multi-pixel heterodyne receivers possible. This dissertation reviews the development of a new generation of terahertz instrumentation at the University of Arizona, with specific emphasis on their optical components and systems. These instruments include several receivers for the Antarctic Submillimeter Telescope and Remote Observatory (formerly installed at the South Pole), including a dual-frequency 492/810 GHz receiver called Wanda, a 4-pixel 810 GHz heterodyne array called PoleSTAR, and a 1.5 THz receiver called TREND. It also covers receivers for the Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope on Mt. Graham in southern Arizona. These receivers include a 7-pixel 345 GHz heterodyne array called DesertSTAR, a 64-pixel polarimeter/bolometer system called Hertz, and a 64-pixel 345 GHz heterodyne array called SuperCam. After reviewing these instruments, concepts for the next generation of arrays and terahertz telescopes designed for the high Atacama desert, Antarctica, high altitude balloon missions, and orbiting observatories will be presented. This dissertation will also cover other contributions made to terahertz astronomy, including the creation of a Gaussian beam propagation program to help design terahertz optical systems and an integrated optics design for a waveguide interferometer to be used as an alternative to traditional bulk optics systems.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWalker, Christopher Ken_US
dc.contributor.chairWalker, Christopher Ken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBurge, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFallahi, Jamesen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2902en_US
dc.identifier.oclc752261064en_US
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