Juvenile Delinquency, IDEA Disability, and School Drop Out in High School Students

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195884
Title:
Juvenile Delinquency, IDEA Disability, and School Drop Out in High School Students
Author:
Glennon, Sara Denise
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Over the past 10-15 years, the epidemiological research literature on juvenile delinquency has suggested that there is an over-representation of males and Hispanics within the juvenile justice system, and a disproportionate number of youths having an IDEA disability, including emotional disability, learning disability, and mental retardation. In addition, juvenile delinquents tend to perform lower academically than their peers, come from low socioeconomic status backgrounds, drop out of school more often, and frequently come into contact with law enforcement agencies. Moreover, low academic achievement, male gender, and drop out contribute to the increased chances that adolescents will become involved in delinquent activities. Characteristics of juvenile delinquents also tend to be stable over time and resistant to most types of intervention.The purpose of the present study was to examine whether there were significantly greater percentages of school drop out in adjudicated versus non-adjudicated delinquent high school youths with and without an IDEA disability diagnosis. Significant differences between standardized test scores of those adjudicated and non-adjudicated youths who dropped out versus remained in school were also examined. Other variables studied in conjunction with these included gender, minority, and free/reduced lunch status.Chi-Square Tests of Independence revealed a significant association between adjudication and drop out, regardless of disability, gender, minority, or free/reduced lunch status. Chi-Square results also showed a significant association between adjudication and disability, but for non-drop out delinquent youths only. Drop out and disability was found to be significantly associated for males only.Univariate Analyses of Variance revealed significant differences in AIMS Reading standard scores between delinquents who had, versus had not, been identified as having a disability. Significant differences in reading scores were also found between those identified, versus not identified as SLD. Furthermore, an interaction effect between disability and minority status was present. Similar differences were found with respect to AIMS Math scores. Limitations and implications of findings as well as future research directions were discussed.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
adjudication; high school students; IDEA disability; juvenile delinquency; school drop out; standardized test scores
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
School Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Morris, Richard J.
Committee Chair:
Morris, Richard J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleJuvenile Delinquency, IDEA Disability, and School Drop Out in High School Studentsen_US
dc.creatorGlennon, Sara Deniseen_US
dc.contributor.authorGlennon, Sara Deniseen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOver the past 10-15 years, the epidemiological research literature on juvenile delinquency has suggested that there is an over-representation of males and Hispanics within the juvenile justice system, and a disproportionate number of youths having an IDEA disability, including emotional disability, learning disability, and mental retardation. In addition, juvenile delinquents tend to perform lower academically than their peers, come from low socioeconomic status backgrounds, drop out of school more often, and frequently come into contact with law enforcement agencies. Moreover, low academic achievement, male gender, and drop out contribute to the increased chances that adolescents will become involved in delinquent activities. Characteristics of juvenile delinquents also tend to be stable over time and resistant to most types of intervention.The purpose of the present study was to examine whether there were significantly greater percentages of school drop out in adjudicated versus non-adjudicated delinquent high school youths with and without an IDEA disability diagnosis. Significant differences between standardized test scores of those adjudicated and non-adjudicated youths who dropped out versus remained in school were also examined. Other variables studied in conjunction with these included gender, minority, and free/reduced lunch status.Chi-Square Tests of Independence revealed a significant association between adjudication and drop out, regardless of disability, gender, minority, or free/reduced lunch status. Chi-Square results also showed a significant association between adjudication and disability, but for non-drop out delinquent youths only. Drop out and disability was found to be significantly associated for males only.Univariate Analyses of Variance revealed significant differences in AIMS Reading standard scores between delinquents who had, versus had not, been identified as having a disability. Significant differences in reading scores were also found between those identified, versus not identified as SLD. Furthermore, an interaction effect between disability and minority status was present. Similar differences were found with respect to AIMS Math scores. Limitations and implications of findings as well as future research directions were discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectadjudicationen_US
dc.subjecthigh school studentsen_US
dc.subjectIDEA disabilityen_US
dc.subjectjuvenile delinquencyen_US
dc.subjectschool drop outen_US
dc.subjectstandardized test scoresen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSchool Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMorris, Richard J.en_US
dc.contributor.chairMorris, Richard J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMishra, Shitala P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAleamoni, Lawrence M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBecker, Judith V.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest10265en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659750873en_US
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