Constructing An Hyphenated Society: Women, Ethnocentrism, and Migration

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195873
Title:
Constructing An Hyphenated Society: Women, Ethnocentrism, and Migration
Author:
Giacomuzzi, Andrea
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In this dissertation I explore the relationship between women, the state, and religious institutions in western Austria--the most conservative part of the country. The fall of the Iron Curtain triggered widespread fears of massive migration flows from Eastern Europe, and created strong sentiments against migrants, especially those from the East and South and led to a rise in ethnocentrism and xenophobia. Turks, who comprise the largest migrant population, are especially vulnerable to the resulting discriminatory practices and attitudes.The questions I posed focused on how Turkish women who have arrived since the economic boom of the 1980s, their children born in Austria, and women of pre-WWII Austrian ancestry deal with the challenges integration brings. Further, I examine the effect patriarchal, elitist discourse has on both Austrian and Turkish migrant women's self-perception, sociopolitical status and their worldviews.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
migration; women; religion; ethnocentrism
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Comparative Cultural & Literary Studies; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Babcock, Barbara A.; Damrel, David W.
Committee Chair:
Babcock, Barbara A.; Damrel, David W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleConstructing An Hyphenated Society: Women, Ethnocentrism, and Migrationen_US
dc.creatorGiacomuzzi, Andreaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGiacomuzzi, Andreaen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this dissertation I explore the relationship between women, the state, and religious institutions in western Austria--the most conservative part of the country. The fall of the Iron Curtain triggered widespread fears of massive migration flows from Eastern Europe, and created strong sentiments against migrants, especially those from the East and South and led to a rise in ethnocentrism and xenophobia. Turks, who comprise the largest migrant population, are especially vulnerable to the resulting discriminatory practices and attitudes.The questions I posed focused on how Turkish women who have arrived since the economic boom of the 1980s, their children born in Austria, and women of pre-WWII Austrian ancestry deal with the challenges integration brings. Further, I examine the effect patriarchal, elitist discourse has on both Austrian and Turkish migrant women's self-perception, sociopolitical status and their worldviews.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectmigrationen_US
dc.subjectwomenen_US
dc.subjectreligionen_US
dc.subjectethnocentrismen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineComparative Cultural & Literary Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBabcock, Barbara A.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorDamrel, David W.en_US
dc.contributor.chairBabcock, Barbara A.en_US
dc.contributor.chairDamrel, David W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBetteridge, Anne H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDarling, Linda T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberde Vet, Therese A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1567en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137355950en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.