Characteristics of Persisting Students Utilizing the Retention Self-Study Framework: A Case Study

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195855
Title:
Characteristics of Persisting Students Utilizing the Retention Self-Study Framework: A Case Study
Author:
Gasser, Ray F
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Although retention has become a critical priority for most institutions, this interest has not yielded significantly increased retention rates over the past 30 years. Understanding how each individual institution could increase retention rates will help to avoid the critics of higher education who have grown wary over the increasing costs. In order to justify the increases in tuition, higher education must show that students can persist, graduate, and succeed in the 'real world'.This exploratory study seeks to provide insight into persistence by focusing on understanding the common themes of students who persisted. In 2001, Woodard, Mallory, & DeLuca published a research article providing a comprehensive structure that incorporates an extensive body of student retention research along with the authors' own research. The framework provides institutions with a model to explore the areas that affect student retention. The authors describe four major components to retention: the student sphere, institutional sphere, academic affairs sphere, and student services sphere. Within each of these spheres is a number of characteristics that research indicates effects retention. The Retention Self-Study Framework (2001) draws heavily from the research of Vincent Tinto (1975, 1987, 1993), John Bean (1980, 1983), Alexander Astin (1984), and Ernest Pascarella (1980).This study investigates the extent to gender, race, high school class rank, socio-economic status, institutional choice, financial aid package, and parents' education relate to the experiences within the Retention Self-Study Framework (Woodard, Mallory, & DeLuca, 2001).Utilizing the Retention Self-Study Framework, the author created a survey that asked students about each of the various characteristics within the four spheres described in the framework. The research was conducted at a large Research-Extensive university in southwest United States of undeclared majors. Utilizing both mixed methods, the research provides a fresh look at issues of retention and those experiences that are related to persistence and suggests implications for practice and future research.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
retention; persistence; first-year; retention self-study framework
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Higher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Woodard, Jr., Dudley B.
Committee Chair:
Woodard, Jr., Dudley B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleCharacteristics of Persisting Students Utilizing the Retention Self-Study Framework: A Case Studyen_US
dc.creatorGasser, Ray Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorGasser, Ray Fen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAlthough retention has become a critical priority for most institutions, this interest has not yielded significantly increased retention rates over the past 30 years. Understanding how each individual institution could increase retention rates will help to avoid the critics of higher education who have grown wary over the increasing costs. In order to justify the increases in tuition, higher education must show that students can persist, graduate, and succeed in the 'real world'.This exploratory study seeks to provide insight into persistence by focusing on understanding the common themes of students who persisted. In 2001, Woodard, Mallory, & DeLuca published a research article providing a comprehensive structure that incorporates an extensive body of student retention research along with the authors' own research. The framework provides institutions with a model to explore the areas that affect student retention. The authors describe four major components to retention: the student sphere, institutional sphere, academic affairs sphere, and student services sphere. Within each of these spheres is a number of characteristics that research indicates effects retention. The Retention Self-Study Framework (2001) draws heavily from the research of Vincent Tinto (1975, 1987, 1993), John Bean (1980, 1983), Alexander Astin (1984), and Ernest Pascarella (1980).This study investigates the extent to gender, race, high school class rank, socio-economic status, institutional choice, financial aid package, and parents' education relate to the experiences within the Retention Self-Study Framework (Woodard, Mallory, & DeLuca, 2001).Utilizing the Retention Self-Study Framework, the author created a survey that asked students about each of the various characteristics within the four spheres described in the framework. The research was conducted at a large Research-Extensive university in southwest United States of undeclared majors. Utilizing both mixed methods, the research provides a fresh look at issues of retention and those experiences that are related to persistence and suggests implications for practice and future research.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectretentionen_US
dc.subjectpersistenceen_US
dc.subjectfirst-yearen_US
dc.subjectretention self-study frameworken_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWoodard, Jr., Dudley B.en_US
dc.contributor.chairWoodard, Jr., Dudley B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCheslock, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLee, Jennyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1482en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137356263en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.