Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195850
Title:
Efferent Control of the Human Auditory System
Author:
Garinis, Angela
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The effects of auditory efferent activity on peripheral physiology may be examined by presenting broadband noise (BBN) to the contralateral ear during otoacoustic emission (OAE) recordings. The presentation of BBN typically produces a reduction of OAE amplitudes in comparison to a condition without BBN. This is termed contralateral suppression. Limited information exists regarding the effects of contralateral BBN on responses observed at higher levels in the auditory system. The present study employed this paradigm to investigate interactions of attention and laterality on the transient evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE), auditory brainstem response (ABR) and cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEP) P1-N1-P2. TEOAEs were evoked by 60 dB SPL clicks; ABRs and CAEPs were evoked by 60 dB SPL 2.0 kHz tone pips in 15 normally hearing adults. Four conditions were employed for each ear: 1) quiet (no noise); 2) 60 dB SPL contralateral BBN; 3) words (at -3 dB SNR) embedded in 60 dB SPL contralateral BBN while subjects classified words as animal versus food items; 4) words from condition #3 played backwards and embedded in 60 dB SPL contralateral BBN. For TEOAEs: 1) more suppression was evident in the active attention condition than the passive listening conditions and 2) right ear OAE amplitudes for the 8-18 ms time period exhibited more suppression in the presence of BBN for all noise conditions, although this did not meet statistical significance. For the ABR experiment, amplitudes in the noise conditions decreased in all epochs for the right ear, but not for the left. For the CAEP experiment, asymmetries were evident in temporal regions and an effect of contralateral noise was evident. The outcome of this investigation suggests that efferent activation by noise and active attention has diverse modulatory effects on electroacoustic and electrophysiologic responses along the auditory pathway.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Efferent System; Contralateral Suppression; Medial Olivary Cochlear Bundle; Adults
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Speech, Language, & Hearing Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Cone-Wesson, Barbara K.
Committee Chair:
Cone-Wesson, Barbara K.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleEfferent Control of the Human Auditory Systemen_US
dc.creatorGarinis, Angelaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGarinis, Angelaen_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe effects of auditory efferent activity on peripheral physiology may be examined by presenting broadband noise (BBN) to the contralateral ear during otoacoustic emission (OAE) recordings. The presentation of BBN typically produces a reduction of OAE amplitudes in comparison to a condition without BBN. This is termed contralateral suppression. Limited information exists regarding the effects of contralateral BBN on responses observed at higher levels in the auditory system. The present study employed this paradigm to investigate interactions of attention and laterality on the transient evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE), auditory brainstem response (ABR) and cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEP) P1-N1-P2. TEOAEs were evoked by 60 dB SPL clicks; ABRs and CAEPs were evoked by 60 dB SPL 2.0 kHz tone pips in 15 normally hearing adults. Four conditions were employed for each ear: 1) quiet (no noise); 2) 60 dB SPL contralateral BBN; 3) words (at -3 dB SNR) embedded in 60 dB SPL contralateral BBN while subjects classified words as animal versus food items; 4) words from condition #3 played backwards and embedded in 60 dB SPL contralateral BBN. For TEOAEs: 1) more suppression was evident in the active attention condition than the passive listening conditions and 2) right ear OAE amplitudes for the 8-18 ms time period exhibited more suppression in the presence of BBN for all noise conditions, although this did not meet statistical significance. For the ABR experiment, amplitudes in the noise conditions decreased in all epochs for the right ear, but not for the left. For the CAEP experiment, asymmetries were evident in temporal regions and an effect of contralateral noise was evident. The outcome of this investigation suggests that efferent activation by noise and active attention has diverse modulatory effects on electroacoustic and electrophysiologic responses along the auditory pathway.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectEfferent Systemen_US
dc.subjectContralateral Suppressionen_US
dc.subjectMedial Olivary Cochlear Bundleen_US
dc.subjectAdultsen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpeech, Language, & Hearing Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCone-Wesson, Barbara K.en_US
dc.contributor.chairCone-Wesson, Barbara K.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGlattke, Theodoreen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPlante, Elenaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVan Petten, Cymaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2891en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659749541en_US
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