Bodies of Capital: Spatial Subjectivity in Twentieth-Century U.S. Fiction

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195847
Title:
Bodies of Capital: Spatial Subjectivity in Twentieth-Century U.S. Fiction
Author:
Gard, Ron
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Positing subjectivity as a structural formation arising dialectically at the cultural intersection of physical bodies and material conditions, Bodies of Capital: Spatial Subjectivity in Twentieth-Century U.S. Fiction identifies textual dynamics as revelatory of the intrinsic relationship between subjective experience and spatial practice. To advance this formulation, Bodies of Capital critically examines a series of U.S. fictional narrative texts from the late nineteenth-century to the present by placing them in dialogue with comparative articulations of U.S. ‘regimes of accumulation’ (spatial formations enacting particular capital organization and conditions) as they developed during this same historical period. Such an approach allows critical analysis to be devoted to material and empirical developments, such as geographical (e.g., urban and suburban growth), institutional (e.g., corporations and markets), and societal (e.g., types of labor) formations, but at all times places primary focus, through its recognition of subjectivity as a spatial and ideological formation, on the practices and dynamics of signification to which these developments critically contribute. Bodies of Capital’s spatio-textual formulation thereby advances the critical enterprise by illuminating the ways in which fictional narrative texts inherently both speak and are spoken by cultural ideologies spatially active at a given time and place. Bodies of Capital allows one, as well, to draw connections otherwise by-andlarge occluded between fictional works appearing at distinctly different times and places across a broad historical expanse, an expanse reflected in the selection of works the dissertation comparatively examines, including William Dean Howells’s The Rise of Silas Lapham, Jack London’s Martin Eden, Theodore Dreiser’s Sister Carrie, Sam Mendes’s American Beauty, Don DeLillo’s White Noise, and Richard Powers’s Gain.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
literature; American; postmodern; globalization; geography; space
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
English; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Deming, Caren; Hogle, Jerrold E.
Committee Chair:
Deming, Caren; Hogle, Jerrold E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleBodies of Capital: Spatial Subjectivity in Twentieth-Century U.S. Fictionen_US
dc.creatorGard, Ronen_US
dc.contributor.authorGard, Ronen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPositing subjectivity as a structural formation arising dialectically at the cultural intersection of physical bodies and material conditions, Bodies of Capital: Spatial Subjectivity in Twentieth-Century U.S. Fiction identifies textual dynamics as revelatory of the intrinsic relationship between subjective experience and spatial practice. To advance this formulation, Bodies of Capital critically examines a series of U.S. fictional narrative texts from the late nineteenth-century to the present by placing them in dialogue with comparative articulations of U.S. ‘regimes of accumulation’ (spatial formations enacting particular capital organization and conditions) as they developed during this same historical period. Such an approach allows critical analysis to be devoted to material and empirical developments, such as geographical (e.g., urban and suburban growth), institutional (e.g., corporations and markets), and societal (e.g., types of labor) formations, but at all times places primary focus, through its recognition of subjectivity as a spatial and ideological formation, on the practices and dynamics of signification to which these developments critically contribute. Bodies of Capital’s spatio-textual formulation thereby advances the critical enterprise by illuminating the ways in which fictional narrative texts inherently both speak and are spoken by cultural ideologies spatially active at a given time and place. Bodies of Capital allows one, as well, to draw connections otherwise by-andlarge occluded between fictional works appearing at distinctly different times and places across a broad historical expanse, an expanse reflected in the selection of works the dissertation comparatively examines, including William Dean Howells’s The Rise of Silas Lapham, Jack London’s Martin Eden, Theodore Dreiser’s Sister Carrie, Sam Mendes’s American Beauty, Don DeLillo’s White Noise, and Richard Powers’s Gain.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectliteratureen_US
dc.subjectAmericanen_US
dc.subjectpostmodernen_US
dc.subjectglobalizationen_US
dc.subjectgeographyen_US
dc.subjectspaceen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDeming, Carenen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHogle, Jerrold E.en_US
dc.contributor.chairDeming, Carenen_US
dc.contributor.chairHogle, Jerrold E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRaval, Sureshen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBertsch, Charlesen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2327en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659748196en_US
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