Fish, Floatboats, AND Feds: The Impact of Commercial Floatboating on ESA Listed Salmon, Disproportionate Regulation and Directions for Recovery Throughout the Columbia River Basin

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195811
Title:
Fish, Floatboats, AND Feds: The Impact of Commercial Floatboating on ESA Listed Salmon, Disproportionate Regulation and Directions for Recovery Throughout the Columbia River Basin
Author:
Fornander, David Eric
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Since the mid 1900s Pacific salmon have declined at an alarming rate. The burden for conserving this regional icon has been placed primarily upon the US Forest Service, whose mandates often times collide with state and private interests and whose actions frequently impact local communities. How much affect such small-scale focus actually has on the recovery of salmon is a topic of much debate.My research investigates the highly regulated industry of commercial floatboating and how it may impact spawning salmon. No significant variance in the timing of redds established in areas that are floated vs. those that are not was identified. Despite this, commercial floatboating remains highly regulated, while other more affective actions are minimally regulated.Results indicate that large disparities currently exist relative to how we regulate actions that impact listed salmon, largely attributed to current interpretation of the ESA. Specific examples include high regulation of local level, federally managed land use strategies such as outdoor recreation and minimal regulation of historic and more affective, state managed land use strategies such as water use and irrigation.Those who support broader scale approaches to recovery have begun to call for a shift in management strategies that focus more on the watershed as a whole. Perceived power, effect and value of various land use types play a prominent role in how recovery strategies are directed and whether or not they are consistent with sound science. Land uses recognized as having the most constituent power were identified as having the most adverse impact on salmon and their recovery. Although a shift in management strategies toward a watershed scale approach would benefit salmon and land users that have the least impact on salmon, it appears unlikely to occur because it would not benefit those that have the most influence or power.With uncertainty surrounding global climate futures, and understanding that we must re-configure institutions to provide alternatives to sustain coupled natural and human systems, I call for a watershed scale approach and consilience across disciplines and scales of governance.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Geography
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Geography; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Robbins, Paul

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleFish, Floatboats, AND Feds: The Impact of Commercial Floatboating on ESA Listed Salmon, Disproportionate Regulation and Directions for Recovery Throughout the Columbia River Basinen_US
dc.creatorFornander, David Ericen_US
dc.contributor.authorFornander, David Ericen_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSince the mid 1900s Pacific salmon have declined at an alarming rate. The burden for conserving this regional icon has been placed primarily upon the US Forest Service, whose mandates often times collide with state and private interests and whose actions frequently impact local communities. How much affect such small-scale focus actually has on the recovery of salmon is a topic of much debate.My research investigates the highly regulated industry of commercial floatboating and how it may impact spawning salmon. No significant variance in the timing of redds established in areas that are floated vs. those that are not was identified. Despite this, commercial floatboating remains highly regulated, while other more affective actions are minimally regulated.Results indicate that large disparities currently exist relative to how we regulate actions that impact listed salmon, largely attributed to current interpretation of the ESA. Specific examples include high regulation of local level, federally managed land use strategies such as outdoor recreation and minimal regulation of historic and more affective, state managed land use strategies such as water use and irrigation.Those who support broader scale approaches to recovery have begun to call for a shift in management strategies that focus more on the watershed as a whole. Perceived power, effect and value of various land use types play a prominent role in how recovery strategies are directed and whether or not they are consistent with sound science. Land uses recognized as having the most constituent power were identified as having the most adverse impact on salmon and their recovery. Although a shift in management strategies toward a watershed scale approach would benefit salmon and land users that have the least impact on salmon, it appears unlikely to occur because it would not benefit those that have the most influence or power.With uncertainty surrounding global climate futures, and understanding that we must re-configure institutions to provide alternatives to sustain coupled natural and human systems, I call for a watershed scale approach and consilience across disciplines and scales of governance.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectGeographyen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeographyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairRobbins, Paulen_US
dc.contributor.committeemembervan Leeuwen, Willem J.D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberYool, Stephen R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShaw, Williamen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2685en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659749690en_US
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