State Appropriations: Implications for Tuition and Financial Aid Policies

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195808
Title:
State Appropriations: Implications for Tuition and Financial Aid Policies
Author:
Foraker, Matthew James
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Over the past 30 years the costs of higher education have climbed faster than the rate the inflation. As these costs have risen, state appropriations for public institutions have not kept pace. While not declining in real dollars, as a portion of meeting the expenses of funding public higher education, state appropriations have been steadily falling over the past three decades. Not surprisingly, during this period tuition at public colleges and universities has risen dramatically, leading to concerns about access to higher education, in particular for students of low income backgrounds.The literature contains many studies highlighting the increasing costs and tuition charged by public colleges and universities. Little has been written about the specific relationship between the level of state appropriations at a particular institution and the pricing and financial aid policies it then adopts. By analyzing the data for public institutions in the Integrated Postsecondary Educational Data System (IPEDS) as well as data for specific students in the National Postsecondary Student Aid Survey (NPSAS) for five school years spanning 1989-1990 to 2003-2004, this study conducts a quantitative analysis to create a predictive model capable of forecasting the impact of changes in state appropriation on institution pricing and financial aid policy. In an environment where the continued decline of state appropriations as a portion of meeting educational costs is a real possibility, such forecasting ability may prove invaluable in crafting policies to insure access to higher education for certain student populations.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Higher Education Finance; State Appropriations; Tuition
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Higher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Cheslock, John J.
Committee Chair:
Cheslock, John J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleState Appropriations: Implications for Tuition and Financial Aid Policiesen_US
dc.creatorForaker, Matthew Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.authorForaker, Matthew Jamesen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOver the past 30 years the costs of higher education have climbed faster than the rate the inflation. As these costs have risen, state appropriations for public institutions have not kept pace. While not declining in real dollars, as a portion of meeting the expenses of funding public higher education, state appropriations have been steadily falling over the past three decades. Not surprisingly, during this period tuition at public colleges and universities has risen dramatically, leading to concerns about access to higher education, in particular for students of low income backgrounds.The literature contains many studies highlighting the increasing costs and tuition charged by public colleges and universities. Little has been written about the specific relationship between the level of state appropriations at a particular institution and the pricing and financial aid policies it then adopts. By analyzing the data for public institutions in the Integrated Postsecondary Educational Data System (IPEDS) as well as data for specific students in the National Postsecondary Student Aid Survey (NPSAS) for five school years spanning 1989-1990 to 2003-2004, this study conducts a quantitative analysis to create a predictive model capable of forecasting the impact of changes in state appropriation on institution pricing and financial aid policy. In an environment where the continued decline of state appropriations as a portion of meeting educational costs is a real possibility, such forecasting ability may prove invaluable in crafting policies to insure access to higher education for certain student populations.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectHigher Education Financeen_US
dc.subjectState Appropriationsen_US
dc.subjectTuitionen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCheslock, John J.en_US
dc.contributor.chairCheslock, John J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKroc II, Richard J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRhoades, Garyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRios-Aguilar, Ceciliaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10331en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659751919en_US
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