Differential Response of Wind and Water Erosion under Climatic Extremes and Alternate Land Management Practices

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195786
Title:
Differential Response of Wind and Water Erosion under Climatic Extremes and Alternate Land Management Practices
Author:
Field, Jason Paul
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Wind erosion and associated dust emissions play a fundamental role in many ecological processes, yet most ecological studies do not explicitly consider dust-driven processes despite the growing body of evidence suggesting that wind erosion is a key driver of land surface dynamics and many other environmentally relevant processes such as desertification. This study provides explicit support for a pervasive underlying but untested desertification hypothesis by showing that at the vegetation patch scale shrubs are significantly more efficient at capturing wind-blown sediment and other resources such as nutrients than grasses and that this difference is amplified following disturbance. At the landscape scale, the spacing and shape of woody plants were found to be a major determinant of dryland aeolian sediment transport processes in grasslands, shrublands, woodlands and forests, particularly following disturbance. This study also found that disturbance such as fire can have a significant influence on background dust emissions, which can have important consequences for many basic ecological and hydrological processes. Potential interactions between aeolian and fluvial processes were also evaluated in this study, and a new conceptual framework was developed that highlights important differences and similarities between the two processes as a function of scale-dependencies, mean annual precipitation, and disturbance. This study also explicitly evaluates the effect of climatic extremes and alternate land management practices on the absolute and relative magnitudes of wind and water erosion. Notably, results indicate that wet/dry climatic extremes and grazing can increase the wind-to-water erosion ratio, whereas burning disproportionally increases water erosion relative to wind erosion.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Aeolian; Drylands; Dust; Erosion; Fluvial; Global change
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Natural Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Breshears, David D.
Committee Chair:
Breshears, David D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDifferential Response of Wind and Water Erosion under Climatic Extremes and Alternate Land Management Practicesen_US
dc.creatorField, Jason Paulen_US
dc.contributor.authorField, Jason Paulen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWind erosion and associated dust emissions play a fundamental role in many ecological processes, yet most ecological studies do not explicitly consider dust-driven processes despite the growing body of evidence suggesting that wind erosion is a key driver of land surface dynamics and many other environmentally relevant processes such as desertification. This study provides explicit support for a pervasive underlying but untested desertification hypothesis by showing that at the vegetation patch scale shrubs are significantly more efficient at capturing wind-blown sediment and other resources such as nutrients than grasses and that this difference is amplified following disturbance. At the landscape scale, the spacing and shape of woody plants were found to be a major determinant of dryland aeolian sediment transport processes in grasslands, shrublands, woodlands and forests, particularly following disturbance. This study also found that disturbance such as fire can have a significant influence on background dust emissions, which can have important consequences for many basic ecological and hydrological processes. Potential interactions between aeolian and fluvial processes were also evaluated in this study, and a new conceptual framework was developed that highlights important differences and similarities between the two processes as a function of scale-dependencies, mean annual precipitation, and disturbance. This study also explicitly evaluates the effect of climatic extremes and alternate land management practices on the absolute and relative magnitudes of wind and water erosion. Notably, results indicate that wet/dry climatic extremes and grazing can increase the wind-to-water erosion ratio, whereas burning disproportionally increases water erosion relative to wind erosion.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectAeolianen_US
dc.subjectDrylandsen_US
dc.subjectDusten_US
dc.subjectErosionen_US
dc.subjectFluvialen_US
dc.subjectGlobal changeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNatural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBreshears, David D.en_US
dc.contributor.chairBreshears, David D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberArcher, Steven R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHuxman, Travis E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWhicker, Jeffrey J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest10755en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659753587en_US
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