Student Beliefs about their Foreign Language Instructors: A Look at the Native Speaker/Non-Native Speaker Issue

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195777
Title:
Student Beliefs about their Foreign Language Instructors: A Look at the Native Speaker/Non-Native Speaker Issue
Author:
Ferguson, Angela
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Research on student attitudes and motivation is extensive (Schumann, 1978; Gardner, 1989). Student beliefs, although less researched, have also been studied (Woods, 1996). Student beliefs towards their instructor's native language could have an influence on their language study by impacting their language learning attitudes and motivation. While the native speaker (NS)/non-native speaker (NNS) distinction has been widely discussed in the English as a Second Language (ESL ) context worldwide (Medgyes, 1992; Phillipson, 1992; Canagarajah, 1999), research pertaining to the foreign language (FL) teaching context in the United States is nearly nonexistent.This study contributes to the body of knowledge concerning the NS/NNS instructor dichotomy by focusing on the NNS FL teacher in the United States. The goal of the investigation is to learn about the belief systems of American university students about what they believe are the general advantages and characteristics of NS and NNS instructors, as well as if they believe NS or NNS instructors are better instructors of specific areas of language study. Their preference for NS or NNS instructors is also examined. General relationships between the student characteristics of 1) being a Spanish major or minor and 2) having an interest to live in a Spanish-speaking countryand 1) NS/NNS instructor superiority belief and 2) preference for NS or NNS instructors are also explored. The instructors' beliefs about language learning are compared to those of their students. Classroom observations were completed to provide a descriptive component of the teachers' comportment in the classroom. Data were collected through questionnaires administered to NS and NNS Spanish instructors and students enrolled in first or second-year Spanish courses at the University of Arizona; interviews with Spanish instructors and students; and classroom observations.The data were analyzed and general findings emerged related to students' beliefs of NS or NNS instructors. Data show that a majority of students do not believe NS or NNS are better overall and also do not have a general preference but rather have beliefs about what should be included in the language classroom. Implications for FL programs, instructors, students, teacher development, and future studies are provided.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
student; instructor; beliefs; second; language
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Second Language Acquisition & Teaching; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Liu, Jun
Committee Chair:
Liu, Jun

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleStudent Beliefs about their Foreign Language Instructors: A Look at the Native Speaker/Non-Native Speaker Issueen_US
dc.creatorFerguson, Angelaen_US
dc.contributor.authorFerguson, Angelaen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractResearch on student attitudes and motivation is extensive (Schumann, 1978; Gardner, 1989). Student beliefs, although less researched, have also been studied (Woods, 1996). Student beliefs towards their instructor's native language could have an influence on their language study by impacting their language learning attitudes and motivation. While the native speaker (NS)/non-native speaker (NNS) distinction has been widely discussed in the English as a Second Language (ESL ) context worldwide (Medgyes, 1992; Phillipson, 1992; Canagarajah, 1999), research pertaining to the foreign language (FL) teaching context in the United States is nearly nonexistent.This study contributes to the body of knowledge concerning the NS/NNS instructor dichotomy by focusing on the NNS FL teacher in the United States. The goal of the investigation is to learn about the belief systems of American university students about what they believe are the general advantages and characteristics of NS and NNS instructors, as well as if they believe NS or NNS instructors are better instructors of specific areas of language study. Their preference for NS or NNS instructors is also examined. General relationships between the student characteristics of 1) being a Spanish major or minor and 2) having an interest to live in a Spanish-speaking countryand 1) NS/NNS instructor superiority belief and 2) preference for NS or NNS instructors are also explored. The instructors' beliefs about language learning are compared to those of their students. Classroom observations were completed to provide a descriptive component of the teachers' comportment in the classroom. Data were collected through questionnaires administered to NS and NNS Spanish instructors and students enrolled in first or second-year Spanish courses at the University of Arizona; interviews with Spanish instructors and students; and classroom observations.The data were analyzed and general findings emerged related to students' beliefs of NS or NNS instructors. Data show that a majority of students do not believe NS or NNS are better overall and also do not have a general preference but rather have beliefs about what should be included in the language classroom. Implications for FL programs, instructors, students, teacher development, and future studies are provided.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectstudenten_US
dc.subjectinstructoren_US
dc.subjectbeliefsen_US
dc.subjectseconden_US
dc.subjectlanguageen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSecond Language Acquisition & Teachingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLiu, Junen_US
dc.contributor.chairLiu, Junen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchulz, Renateen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGilmore, Perryen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1124en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137354080en_US
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