Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195767
Title:
Chronic Pain Management in a Reservation Border Town
Author:
Farrell, Cynthia S.
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Pain is a growing national public health problem that contributes to spiraling health care costs and significant societal burden in the United States. It is the most common reason for seeking health care services, and is the leading cause of disability (CDC, 2008). Inadequately treated pain has profound social, psychological, economic, and physiological consequences for patients, their families, and society (American Pain Society, 2009).A community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach was used for this project to develop a knowledge base about issues associated with chronic pain and its treatment among Native American people in Winslow, AZ. Mixed methods (qualitative and quantitative) were used to gain insight into the local factors that contribute to the self-management and treatment of chronic pain.The results of a provider survey indicated that there are negative psychological traits toward patients with chronic pain such as authoritarianism, intolerance of ambiguity, reliance on technology, and locus of control which are factors that are known to negatively influence pain care (Weinstein et al, 2000). Lack of knowledge regarding pain and pain management along with perceptions and fears related to drug regulatory agencies were additional factors that were found, constituting additional barriers. Patient participants were generally dissatisfied with the pain care practices at Winslow Indian Health. Patient reported treatment goals that included relief of pain, improved quality of life, the ability to return to work, the ability to perform household chores, and the ability to participate in more physical leisure activities.This results of this practice inquiry indicate there is a disconnect between patient and provider views and expectations around pain treatment and the need for further studies to determine the best ways to address chronic pain at the local level. The development of a pain management program is recommended to address the unmet needs of patients with chronic pain. Education in pain management is recommended for healthcare providers, including information regarding the benefits of non-pharmacologic therapies for pain management. The practice inquiry also supports the need for new policies at the local, tribal, and national levels to address pain as a growing public health issue.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
CBPR; complexity; Native American; Pain; Traditional Healing; Whole Systems
Degree Name:
D.N.P.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Nursing; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Koithan, Mary
Committee Chair:
Koithan, Mary

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleChronic Pain Management in a Reservation Border Townen_US
dc.creatorFarrell, Cynthia S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFarrell, Cynthia S.en_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPain is a growing national public health problem that contributes to spiraling health care costs and significant societal burden in the United States. It is the most common reason for seeking health care services, and is the leading cause of disability (CDC, 2008). Inadequately treated pain has profound social, psychological, economic, and physiological consequences for patients, their families, and society (American Pain Society, 2009).A community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach was used for this project to develop a knowledge base about issues associated with chronic pain and its treatment among Native American people in Winslow, AZ. Mixed methods (qualitative and quantitative) were used to gain insight into the local factors that contribute to the self-management and treatment of chronic pain.The results of a provider survey indicated that there are negative psychological traits toward patients with chronic pain such as authoritarianism, intolerance of ambiguity, reliance on technology, and locus of control which are factors that are known to negatively influence pain care (Weinstein et al, 2000). Lack of knowledge regarding pain and pain management along with perceptions and fears related to drug regulatory agencies were additional factors that were found, constituting additional barriers. Patient participants were generally dissatisfied with the pain care practices at Winslow Indian Health. Patient reported treatment goals that included relief of pain, improved quality of life, the ability to return to work, the ability to perform household chores, and the ability to participate in more physical leisure activities.This results of this practice inquiry indicate there is a disconnect between patient and provider views and expectations around pain treatment and the need for further studies to determine the best ways to address chronic pain at the local level. The development of a pain management program is recommended to address the unmet needs of patients with chronic pain. Education in pain management is recommended for healthcare providers, including information regarding the benefits of non-pharmacologic therapies for pain management. The practice inquiry also supports the need for new policies at the local, tribal, and national levels to address pain as a growing public health issue.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectCBPRen_US
dc.subjectcomplexityen_US
dc.subjectNative Americanen_US
dc.subjectPainen_US
dc.subjectTraditional Healingen_US
dc.subjectWhole Systemsen_US
thesis.degree.nameD.N.P.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKoithan, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.chairKoithan, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMichaels, Cathleenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAbraham, Ivoen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11327en_US
dc.identifier.oclc752261179en_US
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