Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195753
Title:
Art and Spirituality: The Ijumu Northeastern-Yoruba Egungun
Author:
Famule, Olawole Francis
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
African art and spirituality are inseparable. Looking at it specifically from the visible, concrete, or tangible standpoint, the latter is nonexistent without the former, as the presence of the former validates the reality of the latter. The origin of this symbiotic relationship is in the Africans' ideology, in which they find it more convenient to establish communication with the transcendent or supernatural realm through visible devices that we label 'art'. Using the Ijumu Northeastern-Yoruba Egungun as a case study, this dissertation analyzes the place of art in African spirituality. Applying two conceptual frameworks--connective theory and linguistic approach, the dissertation first depicts this art as a reflection of African culture. Secondly, it reveals African art as essentially an assemblage or composite of diverse culturally defined and meaningful materials. Finally, it portrays art as a reliable form of historical and iconographical record of the African culture.In all, the dissertation comprises eight chapters. Chapter one introduces the reader to the research rationales, objectives, theory and methodology, and relevant previous studies. Chapter two concerns the place of art in Yoruba religious beliefs and practices within the larger context of African art and culture. Chapter three illustrates the inter-group relations in the Niger-Benue confluence region--the geographical location of the Ijumu Northeastern-Yoruba. Chapter four provides an overview of the cultural practices of the Ijumu people of the Ookun Yoruba-speaking groups. Chapter five focuses on the spirituality and performance contexts and the devotees' conceptualization of the Egungun as a religion.Chapter six is about iconographical interpretations of Egungun. Chapter seven illustrates the aesthetic implications with attention paid to the masquerade costumes as well as the performance contexts of the masquerades or masqueraders, drummers, singers, and more importantly, the aftermath of the ritual festival. Chapter eight is about critical perspectives on Ijumu-Yoruba Egungun within the larger context of the tradition among the entire Yoruba peoples. It highlights critical issues affecting the Egungun tradition today and the relevance of this dissertation to arresting their loss.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
African art and spirituality; Yoruba Egungun
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
History & Theory of Art; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ivey, Paul E.
Committee Chair:
Ivey, Paul E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleArt and Spirituality: The Ijumu Northeastern-Yoruba Egungunen_US
dc.creatorFamule, Olawole Francisen_US
dc.contributor.authorFamule, Olawole Francisen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAfrican art and spirituality are inseparable. Looking at it specifically from the visible, concrete, or tangible standpoint, the latter is nonexistent without the former, as the presence of the former validates the reality of the latter. The origin of this symbiotic relationship is in the Africans' ideology, in which they find it more convenient to establish communication with the transcendent or supernatural realm through visible devices that we label 'art'. Using the Ijumu Northeastern-Yoruba Egungun as a case study, this dissertation analyzes the place of art in African spirituality. Applying two conceptual frameworks--connective theory and linguistic approach, the dissertation first depicts this art as a reflection of African culture. Secondly, it reveals African art as essentially an assemblage or composite of diverse culturally defined and meaningful materials. Finally, it portrays art as a reliable form of historical and iconographical record of the African culture.In all, the dissertation comprises eight chapters. Chapter one introduces the reader to the research rationales, objectives, theory and methodology, and relevant previous studies. Chapter two concerns the place of art in Yoruba religious beliefs and practices within the larger context of African art and culture. Chapter three illustrates the inter-group relations in the Niger-Benue confluence region--the geographical location of the Ijumu Northeastern-Yoruba. Chapter four provides an overview of the cultural practices of the Ijumu people of the Ookun Yoruba-speaking groups. Chapter five focuses on the spirituality and performance contexts and the devotees' conceptualization of the Egungun as a religion.Chapter six is about iconographical interpretations of Egungun. Chapter seven illustrates the aesthetic implications with attention paid to the masquerade costumes as well as the performance contexts of the masquerades or masqueraders, drummers, singers, and more importantly, the aftermath of the ritual festival. Chapter eight is about critical perspectives on Ijumu-Yoruba Egungun within the larger context of the tradition among the entire Yoruba peoples. It highlights critical issues affecting the Egungun tradition today and the relevance of this dissertation to arresting their loss.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectAfrican art and spiritualityen_US
dc.subjectYoruba Egungunen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistory & Theory of Arten_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorIvey, Paul E.en_US
dc.contributor.chairIvey, Paul E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberUsman, Aribidesi A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHansen, Julie V.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcElroy, Keithen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1372en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137355316en_US
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