Genetic and Reproductive Patterns within the Cactophilic Fly Species Drosophila pachea and their Association with Early Stages of Speciation

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195727
Title:
Genetic and Reproductive Patterns within the Cactophilic Fly Species Drosophila pachea and their Association with Early Stages of Speciation
Author:
Erez, Tamar
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Drosophila pachea is a cactophilic fly that feeds and breeds exclusively in necroting tissue of the senita cactus. Based on mitochondrial DNA loci, fly populations are genetically different between the two main regions (Baja and Sonora) of the fly's distribution. A single polymorphism Y linked fertility gene exhibit similar genetic patterns of regional differences within the species. Contrasting genetic patterns were observed based on microsatellite markers such that no regional split was identified. The species can be considered as a simple panmictic population along it's entire range. High remating frequency was observed in populations of both regions with equal number of offspring per father, suggesting that sperm competition might be limited within the fly populations. However, differential sperm use was observed between populations across the gulf of California. Sonoran male sperm produced more offspring than that of Baja males when females of both regions mated sequentially with males of these regions. The genetic pattern observed of higher variation within Sonora compared to Baja and a unique Y linked haplotype that is absent in Sonora and in relative high frequency within Baja suggest that unidirectional gene flow might occur within the species. These genetic patterns are in concordance with the reproductive behavior observations of higher Sonoran male productivity compared with Baja males.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Ecology & Evolutionary Biology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Walsh, Bruce J.
Committee Chair:
Walsh, Bruce J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleGenetic and Reproductive Patterns within the Cactophilic Fly Species Drosophila pachea and their Association with Early Stages of Speciationen_US
dc.creatorErez, Tamaren_US
dc.contributor.authorErez, Tamaren_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDrosophila pachea is a cactophilic fly that feeds and breeds exclusively in necroting tissue of the senita cactus. Based on mitochondrial DNA loci, fly populations are genetically different between the two main regions (Baja and Sonora) of the fly's distribution. A single polymorphism Y linked fertility gene exhibit similar genetic patterns of regional differences within the species. Contrasting genetic patterns were observed based on microsatellite markers such that no regional split was identified. The species can be considered as a simple panmictic population along it's entire range. High remating frequency was observed in populations of both regions with equal number of offspring per father, suggesting that sperm competition might be limited within the fly populations. However, differential sperm use was observed between populations across the gulf of California. Sonoran male sperm produced more offspring than that of Baja males when females of both regions mated sequentially with males of these regions. The genetic pattern observed of higher variation within Sonora compared to Baja and a unique Y linked haplotype that is absent in Sonora and in relative high frequency within Baja suggest that unidirectional gene flow might occur within the species. These genetic patterns are in concordance with the reproductive behavior observations of higher Sonoran male productivity compared with Baja males.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEcology & Evolutionary Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWalsh, Bruce J.en_US
dc.contributor.chairWalsh, Bruce J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHammer, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMachado, Carlosen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKidwell, Margareten_US
dc.identifier.proquest1943en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747147en_US
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