'The Last Light of Indian Buddhism' - The Monk Zhikong in 14th Century China and Korea

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195705
Title:
'The Last Light of Indian Buddhism' - The Monk Zhikong in 14th Century China and Korea
Author:
Dziwenka, Ronald James
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation investigates the northeast Indian Buddhist Monk, Dhyanabhadra (Zhikong, Kor. Jigong, Sunyadisaya, ca. 1289-1364 C.E.). He began his more than a decade of study in the Nalanda Mahavihara education system late in the 13th century, and then at the age of nineteen began a journey to the east and a life that would lead to him being known as "the last light of Indian Buddhism" in East Asia.This study is inspired by two goals. One is to retrace the formation, dissemination and reception of his thought and soteriological paradigm of practice from his native state of Magadha, then Sri Lanka, and then throughout India, Yuan China and Goryeo Korea. The other is it explicate the main elements and concepts of his thought and present them to the academic community.I examine Zhikong's thought through my translations and discussions of key passages from three primary source texts on him, as well as other writings, in order to situate his Buddhist thought and practice within the historical context of Buddhism in the Yuan capital and Goryeo. I propose that Zhikong's representative paradigm of practice, based on the "(neither arising nor) non-arising precepts (wusheng jie)" system, emphasized a socio-ethical approach that viewed the realization of awakening as available to the laity as well as monks. He was especially attracted to minoritized or marginalized peoples in Yuan society, specifically members of the Goryeo expatriate community in the Yuan capital of Dadu (Beijing). I argue that the elements and concepts of Zhikong's representative "(neither arising nor) non-arising precepts" system more closely resemble those of late-Goryeo Buddhism's "bodhisattva precepts" system than those of Yuan-period Chinese Chan's "pure rules of Chan" precepts system.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Hoeam Temple; Magadha; Nalanda; Yuan Buddhism; Zhengxu Temple; Zhikong (Dhyanabhadra)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
East Asian Studies; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Wu, Jiang

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.title'The Last Light of Indian Buddhism' - The Monk Zhikong in 14th Century China and Koreaen_US
dc.creatorDziwenka, Ronald Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.authorDziwenka, Ronald Jamesen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation investigates the northeast Indian Buddhist Monk, Dhyanabhadra (Zhikong, Kor. Jigong, Sunyadisaya, ca. 1289-1364 C.E.). He began his more than a decade of study in the Nalanda Mahavihara education system late in the 13th century, and then at the age of nineteen began a journey to the east and a life that would lead to him being known as "the last light of Indian Buddhism" in East Asia.This study is inspired by two goals. One is to retrace the formation, dissemination and reception of his thought and soteriological paradigm of practice from his native state of Magadha, then Sri Lanka, and then throughout India, Yuan China and Goryeo Korea. The other is it explicate the main elements and concepts of his thought and present them to the academic community.I examine Zhikong's thought through my translations and discussions of key passages from three primary source texts on him, as well as other writings, in order to situate his Buddhist thought and practice within the historical context of Buddhism in the Yuan capital and Goryeo. I propose that Zhikong's representative paradigm of practice, based on the "(neither arising nor) non-arising precepts (wusheng jie)" system, emphasized a socio-ethical approach that viewed the realization of awakening as available to the laity as well as monks. He was especially attracted to minoritized or marginalized peoples in Yuan society, specifically members of the Goryeo expatriate community in the Yuan capital of Dadu (Beijing). I argue that the elements and concepts of Zhikong's representative "(neither arising nor) non-arising precepts" system more closely resemble those of late-Goryeo Buddhism's "bodhisattva precepts" system than those of Yuan-period Chinese Chan's "pure rules of Chan" precepts system.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectHoeam Templeen_US
dc.subjectMagadhaen_US
dc.subjectNalandaen_US
dc.subjectYuan Buddhismen_US
dc.subjectZhengxu Templeen_US
dc.subjectZhikong (Dhyanabhadra)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEast Asian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWu, Jiangen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPao Tao, Chia-linen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPinnington, Noelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGoodman, Yettaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11100en_US
dc.identifier.oclc752260972en_US
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