Behavioral and Theoretical Evidence that Non-directional Motion Detectors Underlie the Visual Estimation of Speed in Insects.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195704
Title:
Behavioral and Theoretical Evidence that Non-directional Motion Detectors Underlie the Visual Estimation of Speed in Insects.
Author:
Dyhr, Jonathan Peter
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Insects use an estimate of the angular speed of the visual image across the eye (termed optic flow) for a wide variety of behaviors including flight speed control, visual navigation, depth estimation, grazing landings, and visual odometry. Despite the behavioral importance of visual speed estimation, the neuronal mechanisms by which the brain extracts optic flow information from the retinal image remain unknown. This dissertation investigates the underlying neuronal mechanisms of visual speed estimation via three complementary strategies: the development of neuronally-based computational models, testing of the models in a behavioral simulation framework, and behavioral experiments using bumblebees. Using these methods I demonstrate the sufficiency of two non-directional models of motion detection for reproducing real-world, speed dependent behaviors, propose potential neuronal circuits by which these models may be physiologically implemented, and predict the expected responses of these neurons to a range of visual stimuli.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Computational Modeling; Motion Detection; Optic Flow; Vision
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Neuroscience; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Higgins, Charles M.
Committee Chair:
Higgins, Charles M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleBehavioral and Theoretical Evidence that Non-directional Motion Detectors Underlie the Visual Estimation of Speed in Insects.en_US
dc.creatorDyhr, Jonathan Peteren_US
dc.contributor.authorDyhr, Jonathan Peteren_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractInsects use an estimate of the angular speed of the visual image across the eye (termed optic flow) for a wide variety of behaviors including flight speed control, visual navigation, depth estimation, grazing landings, and visual odometry. Despite the behavioral importance of visual speed estimation, the neuronal mechanisms by which the brain extracts optic flow information from the retinal image remain unknown. This dissertation investigates the underlying neuronal mechanisms of visual speed estimation via three complementary strategies: the development of neuronally-based computational models, testing of the models in a behavioral simulation framework, and behavioral experiments using bumblebees. Using these methods I demonstrate the sufficiency of two non-directional models of motion detection for reproducing real-world, speed dependent behaviors, propose potential neuronal circuits by which these models may be physiologically implemented, and predict the expected responses of these neurons to a range of visual stimuli.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectComputational Modelingen_US
dc.subjectMotion Detectionen_US
dc.subjectOptic Flowen_US
dc.subjectVisionen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNeuroscienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHiggins, Charles M.en_US
dc.contributor.chairHiggins, Charles M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGronenberg, Wuliflaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSecomb, Timothy W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStrausfeld, Nicholas J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWatkins, Joseph C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest10773en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659753616en_US
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