Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195697
Title:
Principal Behaviors That Support First-Year Teacher Retention
Author:
Dumler, Carolyn Marie
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
High attrition during the first few years of teaching is a long-standing dilemma. Research findings vary somewhat according to specific studies, but it is estimated that about 30% of new teachers do not teach beyond two years, and within the first five years of teaching 40-50% leave the profession.Traditionally, discussions of new teacher induction have not considered the role of the school principal as significant (Carver, 2003). However, Brock & Grady (2001) found that beginning teachers identified the school principal as the most significant person in the school, as well as a key source of support and guidance. A recent exploratory case study of the supportive behaviors of four principals resulted in a structural framework of recommended practices (Carver, 2002); however, the importance of those behaviors in the retention of first-year teachers has not been studied.This mixed methods research study examined the relationship between principal support behaviors and the likelihood of first-year teachers remaining in the teaching profession. Q sorts, detailed questionnaires, and follow-up interviews were conducted with first-year and fifth-year teachers.Findings indicated that principal support was important to some first-year teachers in making retention decisions; additionally, specific principal behaviors that have the most influence on the likelihood of first-year teachers remaining in the profession were identified. Analysis resulted in the development of a list of 10 principal support behaviors that are most likely to influence first-year teachers to remain in teaching. These findings could prove beneficial in stemming the attrition rate of new teachers.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Beginning Teacher; First-Year Teacher; New Teacher Attrition; New Teacher Retention; Principal Support Behaviors
Degree Name:
Ed.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Leadership; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hendricks, J. Robert
Committee Chair:
Hendricks, J. Robert

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titlePrincipal Behaviors That Support First-Year Teacher Retentionen_US
dc.creatorDumler, Carolyn Marieen_US
dc.contributor.authorDumler, Carolyn Marieen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractHigh attrition during the first few years of teaching is a long-standing dilemma. Research findings vary somewhat according to specific studies, but it is estimated that about 30% of new teachers do not teach beyond two years, and within the first five years of teaching 40-50% leave the profession.Traditionally, discussions of new teacher induction have not considered the role of the school principal as significant (Carver, 2003). However, Brock & Grady (2001) found that beginning teachers identified the school principal as the most significant person in the school, as well as a key source of support and guidance. A recent exploratory case study of the supportive behaviors of four principals resulted in a structural framework of recommended practices (Carver, 2002); however, the importance of those behaviors in the retention of first-year teachers has not been studied.This mixed methods research study examined the relationship between principal support behaviors and the likelihood of first-year teachers remaining in the teaching profession. Q sorts, detailed questionnaires, and follow-up interviews were conducted with first-year and fifth-year teachers.Findings indicated that principal support was important to some first-year teachers in making retention decisions; additionally, specific principal behaviors that have the most influence on the likelihood of first-year teachers remaining in the profession were identified. Analysis resulted in the development of a list of 10 principal support behaviors that are most likely to influence first-year teachers to remain in teaching. These findings could prove beneficial in stemming the attrition rate of new teachers.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectBeginning Teacheren_US
dc.subjectFirst-Year Teacheren_US
dc.subjectNew Teacher Attritionen_US
dc.subjectNew Teacher Retentionen_US
dc.subjectPrincipal Support Behaviorsen_US
thesis.degree.nameEd.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Leadershipen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHendricks, J. Roberten_US
dc.contributor.chairHendricks, J. Roberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBosworth, Krisen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPedicone, Johnen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10954en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659754872en_US
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