Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195696
Title:
Essays on Experimental Coordination Games
Author:
Dugar, Subhasish
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The research reported in this dissertation explores the coordination problem faced by economic agents in various strategic environments. The first chapter provides an experimental test of a theory of collusion in the presence of price-matching guarantees and thus throws light on the equilibrium selection problem embedded in this market game. The experiment yields important empirical information regarding the competitive nature of these low-price guarantees in the laboratory.In the second chapter, more general theoretical models are developed that undermine any collusive equilibrium in the presence of price-matching guarantees. Although the theory predicts that the competitive price should emerge in equilibrium in all these models, systematic discrepancy between the theoretical prediction and the observed behavior is found.In the third chapter, a well-known paradox is tested in the laboratory. Braess paradox (Braess, 1968) consists of showing that, in equilibrium, adding a new link that connects two routes running between a common origin and common destination may raise the travel cost for each network user. The experiment is designed to study whether the paradox is behaviorally realized in the critical minimal simulated traffic network. Results reject the hypothesis that the paradox is of marginal value and its force, if at all evident, diminishes with experience.In the last chapter, using controlled laboratory experiments, I study how the problem of coordination failure, as embedded in the 'minimum-effort' coordination game, can be overcome using structured, ex post feedbacks related to individual performance among members of a large group. I allow two types of performance feedback mechanisms, namely, negative and positive. I use 'disapproval' and 'approval' ratings about individual choices by group members as proxies for negative and positive feedback mechanisms, respectively. Results show that where participants are allowed to express only disapproval of others' choices, play converges towards the most efficient coordination. In contrast, where participants can express only approval of others' choices, inefficient coordination is obtained.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
COORDINATION; EXPERIMENTS
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Economics; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
DUFWENBERG, MARTIN; COX, JAMES C
Committee Chair:
DUFWENBERG, MARTIN; COX, JAMES C

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleEssays on Experimental Coordination Gamesen_US
dc.creatorDugar, Subhasishen_US
dc.contributor.authorDugar, Subhasishen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe research reported in this dissertation explores the coordination problem faced by economic agents in various strategic environments. The first chapter provides an experimental test of a theory of collusion in the presence of price-matching guarantees and thus throws light on the equilibrium selection problem embedded in this market game. The experiment yields important empirical information regarding the competitive nature of these low-price guarantees in the laboratory.In the second chapter, more general theoretical models are developed that undermine any collusive equilibrium in the presence of price-matching guarantees. Although the theory predicts that the competitive price should emerge in equilibrium in all these models, systematic discrepancy between the theoretical prediction and the observed behavior is found.In the third chapter, a well-known paradox is tested in the laboratory. Braess paradox (Braess, 1968) consists of showing that, in equilibrium, adding a new link that connects two routes running between a common origin and common destination may raise the travel cost for each network user. The experiment is designed to study whether the paradox is behaviorally realized in the critical minimal simulated traffic network. Results reject the hypothesis that the paradox is of marginal value and its force, if at all evident, diminishes with experience.In the last chapter, using controlled laboratory experiments, I study how the problem of coordination failure, as embedded in the 'minimum-effort' coordination game, can be overcome using structured, ex post feedbacks related to individual performance among members of a large group. I allow two types of performance feedback mechanisms, namely, negative and positive. I use 'disapproval' and 'approval' ratings about individual choices by group members as proxies for negative and positive feedback mechanisms, respectively. Results show that where participants are allowed to express only disapproval of others' choices, play converges towards the most efficient coordination. In contrast, where participants can express only approval of others' choices, inefficient coordination is obtained.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectCOORDINATIONen_US
dc.subjectEXPERIMENTSen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEconomicsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDUFWENBERG, MARTINen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCOX, JAMES Cen_US
dc.contributor.chairDUFWENBERG, MARTINen_US
dc.contributor.chairCOX, JAMES Cen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCox, James C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRapoport, Amnonen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReiley, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReynolds, Stanleyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1752en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747511en_US
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