The Shape of the Commons: Social Networks and the Conservation of Small-scale Fisheries in the Northern Gulf of California, Mexico

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195690
Title:
The Shape of the Commons: Social Networks and the Conservation of Small-scale Fisheries in the Northern Gulf of California, Mexico
Author:
Duberstein, Jennifer Nell
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
One of the biggest questions surrounding common-pool natural resources (CPRs) lies in understanding the circumstances which increase the likelihood of sustainable use and those that lead to resource degradation. Small-scale fisheries are an example of a CPR that has proven difficult to manage sustainably. I use social network analysis methods to examine the social connectivity of small-scale fishing communities and the association of network structures with collaborative behavior of small-scale fisheries in the Northern Gulf of California, Mexico.I found considerable connectivity of communities via kinship ties of small-scale fishers, both within the region and to other areas in Mexico. Fisher kinship relationships are important mechanisms for information transfer. Identifying communities in the network that are most likely to share information with other communities allows managers to develop more effective and efficient education, outreach, and enforcement efforts.Communities are also connected by their use of the same fishing zones and Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). My results provide suggestions for dividing communities based on common use of fishing areas and MPAs. This may help fishers and managers to develop, implement, and enforce boundary rules that will facilitate regional management of small-scale fisheries. My results provided mixed evidence for the role of social structure in impacting positive outcomes for fisher' ability to collaborate and organize. A wide range of factors affect the emergence of institutions for CPR management. Similarly, finding a common network structure that can accurately predict sustainable use of CPRs is unlikely. Knowing how people are connected and the ways in which information about CPR resources moves through (or is hindered from moving through) a network can improve manager's ability to develop more effective strategies and actions. Adding social networks into the CPR management toolbox provides a mechanism by which those working in management and conservation can incorporate social structure into management activities.An understanding of the social networks that connect communities and the potential pathways for information transfer, combined with a system of enforceable rules and policies and effective outreach methods and materials, may help managers and resource users more effectively and sustainably manage CPRs in the long term.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
common-pool resources; Gulf of California; Mexico; marine protected areas; natural resource management; small-scale fisheries; social network analysis
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Natural Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Shaw, William W.
Committee Chair:
Shaw, William W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleThe Shape of the Commons: Social Networks and the Conservation of Small-scale Fisheries in the Northern Gulf of California, Mexicoen_US
dc.creatorDuberstein, Jennifer Nellen_US
dc.contributor.authorDuberstein, Jennifer Nellen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOne of the biggest questions surrounding common-pool natural resources (CPRs) lies in understanding the circumstances which increase the likelihood of sustainable use and those that lead to resource degradation. Small-scale fisheries are an example of a CPR that has proven difficult to manage sustainably. I use social network analysis methods to examine the social connectivity of small-scale fishing communities and the association of network structures with collaborative behavior of small-scale fisheries in the Northern Gulf of California, Mexico.I found considerable connectivity of communities via kinship ties of small-scale fishers, both within the region and to other areas in Mexico. Fisher kinship relationships are important mechanisms for information transfer. Identifying communities in the network that are most likely to share information with other communities allows managers to develop more effective and efficient education, outreach, and enforcement efforts.Communities are also connected by their use of the same fishing zones and Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). My results provide suggestions for dividing communities based on common use of fishing areas and MPAs. This may help fishers and managers to develop, implement, and enforce boundary rules that will facilitate regional management of small-scale fisheries. My results provided mixed evidence for the role of social structure in impacting positive outcomes for fisher' ability to collaborate and organize. A wide range of factors affect the emergence of institutions for CPR management. Similarly, finding a common network structure that can accurately predict sustainable use of CPRs is unlikely. Knowing how people are connected and the ways in which information about CPR resources moves through (or is hindered from moving through) a network can improve manager's ability to develop more effective strategies and actions. Adding social networks into the CPR management toolbox provides a mechanism by which those working in management and conservation can incorporate social structure into management activities.An understanding of the social networks that connect communities and the potential pathways for information transfer, combined with a system of enforceable rules and policies and effective outreach methods and materials, may help managers and resource users more effectively and sustainably manage CPRs in the long term.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectcommon-pool resourcesen_US
dc.subjectGulf of Californiaen_US
dc.subjectMexicoen_US
dc.subjectmarine protected areasen_US
dc.subjectnatural resource managementen_US
dc.subjectsmall-scale fisheriesen_US
dc.subjectsocial network analysisen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNatural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorShaw, William W.en_US
dc.contributor.chairShaw, William W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTorre, Jorgeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGimblett, H. Randyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSallaz, Jeffrey Jen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchlager, Edellaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10811en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659753668en_US
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