A Content Analysis of the Counseling Sessions of Dyads with Breast and Prostate Cancer: Linguistic Predictors of Psychosocial Adjustment and Thematic Analysis of Key Concerns

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195682
Title:
A Content Analysis of the Counseling Sessions of Dyads with Breast and Prostate Cancer: Linguistic Predictors of Psychosocial Adjustment and Thematic Analysis of Key Concerns
Author:
Dorros, Sybilla M.
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this investigation was to explore how participants' language use during counseling (overall emotional expression, positive emotional expression, and communal coping, or "we-talk") was associated with superior adjustment, as measured by four psychosocial outcome variables (depression, positive affect, negative affect, and relationship satisfaction); as well as to identify the key concerns of dyads with cancer, how concerns differed by role and sex, and if they were associated with participants' well-being. The present study was a content analysis of the counseling sessions of 43 dyads (N = 86) with breast and prostate cancer. Using a multi-method approach, the audio recordings of 228 counseling sessions were transcribed and analyzed linguistically (quantitatively) and thematically (qualitatively).Results of the linguistic analyses revealed that participant's use of "we-talk" had the most consistent and beneficial effect on outcomes; specifically improved depression, negative affect, and relationship satisfaction. These findings suggest that it might not be as important how much a person expresses themselves emotionally, but rather, whether they have a close relational partner that they see as an instrumental part of their coping process and significantly intertwined in their life, which is reflected in their language use of communal coping.Results of the thematic analyses revealed that survivors' concerns were more focused on cancer and treatment related issues, whereas partners' concerns centered on the well-being of their spouse/partner with cancer, and what they were doing to help their loved one cope with his/her illness. The overarching key concern that was intertwined in participants' discourse was frequent discussion of relationship maintenance, negotiation, and communication issues. In addition, discussion of these concerns showed greatest benefits for women with breast cancer.The findings of this study has implications for counselors and clinicians in that language use and topics discussed during counseling have the potential to increase psychosocial adjustment for dyads coping with cancer. The general discourse of survivors mirrored that of their partners, which indicates that helping to modify or change how one person speaks, has the potential to influence how their partner talks as well; which has implications for the well-being of both dyad members.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
breast and prostate cancer survivors and their partners; key concerns of dyads with cancer; language use during counseling; LIWC; linguistic analyses; psychosocial well-being and outcomes; thematic analyses of key concerns
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Communication; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Segrin, Chris
Committee Chair:
Segrin, Chris

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleA Content Analysis of the Counseling Sessions of Dyads with Breast and Prostate Cancer: Linguistic Predictors of Psychosocial Adjustment and Thematic Analysis of Key Concernsen_US
dc.creatorDorros, Sybilla M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDorros, Sybilla M.en_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this investigation was to explore how participants' language use during counseling (overall emotional expression, positive emotional expression, and communal coping, or "we-talk") was associated with superior adjustment, as measured by four psychosocial outcome variables (depression, positive affect, negative affect, and relationship satisfaction); as well as to identify the key concerns of dyads with cancer, how concerns differed by role and sex, and if they were associated with participants' well-being. The present study was a content analysis of the counseling sessions of 43 dyads (N = 86) with breast and prostate cancer. Using a multi-method approach, the audio recordings of 228 counseling sessions were transcribed and analyzed linguistically (quantitatively) and thematically (qualitatively).Results of the linguistic analyses revealed that participant's use of "we-talk" had the most consistent and beneficial effect on outcomes; specifically improved depression, negative affect, and relationship satisfaction. These findings suggest that it might not be as important how much a person expresses themselves emotionally, but rather, whether they have a close relational partner that they see as an instrumental part of their coping process and significantly intertwined in their life, which is reflected in their language use of communal coping.Results of the thematic analyses revealed that survivors' concerns were more focused on cancer and treatment related issues, whereas partners' concerns centered on the well-being of their spouse/partner with cancer, and what they were doing to help their loved one cope with his/her illness. The overarching key concern that was intertwined in participants' discourse was frequent discussion of relationship maintenance, negotiation, and communication issues. In addition, discussion of these concerns showed greatest benefits for women with breast cancer.The findings of this study has implications for counselors and clinicians in that language use and topics discussed during counseling have the potential to increase psychosocial adjustment for dyads coping with cancer. The general discourse of survivors mirrored that of their partners, which indicates that helping to modify or change how one person speaks, has the potential to influence how their partner talks as well; which has implications for the well-being of both dyad members.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectbreast and prostate cancer survivors and their partnersen_US
dc.subjectkey concerns of dyads with canceren_US
dc.subjectlanguage use during counselingen_US
dc.subjectLIWCen_US
dc.subjectlinguistic analysesen_US
dc.subjectpsychosocial well-being and outcomesen_US
dc.subjectthematic analyses of key concernsen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSegrin, Chrisen_US
dc.contributor.chairSegrin, Chrisen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBadger, Terryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHarwood, Jakeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMehl, Matthiasen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10924en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659754820en_US
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