Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195677
Title:
Bacterial Motility: From Propulsion to Collective Behavior
Author:
Dombrowski, Christopher Charles
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This work explores bacterial motility from the mechanisms of propulsion of an individual cell to the complex behavior of collective motility. The shear modulus of bacterial flagella was measured by stretching isolated flagella with an optical trap and by measuring force extension curves of the stretched flagella shedding light onto the me-chanics involved in the motility of single micro-organisms. Experiments in concentrated suspensions of bacteria show collective behavior with large scale mixing on a time and length scale greater than can be understood from the standard model of "run and tumble" motility of a single organism are reported. To further understand the transition from individual to collective motility a novel form of motility where an individual bacterium can reverse direction without changing cell orientation is reported here. These experiments further the understanding of bacterial motility.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Flagella; Spirochete; B. subtilis; motility
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Physics; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Goldstein, Raymond E.
Committee Chair:
Goldstein, Raymond E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleBacterial Motility: From Propulsion to Collective Behavioren_US
dc.creatorDombrowski, Christopher Charlesen_US
dc.contributor.authorDombrowski, Christopher Charlesen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis work explores bacterial motility from the mechanisms of propulsion of an individual cell to the complex behavior of collective motility. The shear modulus of bacterial flagella was measured by stretching isolated flagella with an optical trap and by measuring force extension curves of the stretched flagella shedding light onto the me-chanics involved in the motility of single micro-organisms. Experiments in concentrated suspensions of bacteria show collective behavior with large scale mixing on a time and length scale greater than can be understood from the standard model of "run and tumble" motility of a single organism are reported. To further understand the transition from individual to collective motility a novel form of motility where an individual bacterium can reverse direction without changing cell orientation is reported here. These experiments further the understanding of bacterial motility.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectFlagellaen_US
dc.subjectSpirocheteen_US
dc.subjectB. subtilisen_US
dc.subjectmotilityen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysicsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGoldstein, Raymond E.en_US
dc.contributor.chairGoldstein, Raymond E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVisscher, Koenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKessler, John O.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberManne, Srinivasen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHsieh, Ke Chiangen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2307en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659748162en_US
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