Identification and Characterization of Novel Proteins and Pathways for mRNA Degradation and Quality Control in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195676
Title:
Identification and Characterization of Novel Proteins and Pathways for mRNA Degradation and Quality Control in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae
Author:
Doma, Meenakshi Kshirsagar
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In eukaryotes, mRNA decay pathways are important for cellular response to various physiological conditions and also function in co-translational quality control systems that target translationally aberrant mRNAs for degradation. My work on identification and characterization of novel components and pathways of mRNA degradation and quality control in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is summarized below.I have identified Edc3p as a novel protein important for mRNA decay. Deletion of Edc3p leads to a defect in mRNA decay in strains deficient in decapping enzymes and, in combination with a block to the 3' to 5' decay pathway, causes exaggerated growth defects and synthetic lethality. An Edc3p-GFP fusion protein localizes in processing bodies, which are specialized cytoplasmic foci containing decapping proteins. Together, these observations indicate that Edc3p directly interacts with the decapping complex to stimulate the mRNA decapping rate.Quality control during mRNA translation is critical for regulation of gene expression. My work shows that yeast mRNAs with defects in translation elongation, due to strong translational pauses, are recognized and targeted for degradation via an endonucleolytic cleavage in a novel process referred to as No-Go Decay (NGD). The cellular mRNA decay machinery degrades the 5' and 3' cleavage products produced by NGD. NGD is translation-dependent, occurs in a range of mRNAs and can be induced by a variety of elongation pauses. These results indicate NGD may occur at some rate in response to any stalled ribosome.I also show that two highly conserved proteins, Dom34p and Hbs1p, homologous to the eukaryotic release factors eRF1 and eRF3 respectively, are required for NGD. Further characterization of the No-Go decay pathway indicates that Dom34p function during NGD is conserved across species. Identification of RPS30, a small ribosomal protein as a trans-acting factor during NGD suggests that the ribosome may have a novel role during NGD. Other experiments indicate that the No-Go decay pathway may cross talk with the unfolded protein response pathway. The identification of No-Go decay as a novel quality control pathway during translation elongation supports the existence of a global cellular mechanism for maintenance of translational quality control.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
mRNA decay; Translation elongation; Ribosomal stall; Post transcriptional control of gene expression; Quality control; mRNA surveillance
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Molecular & Cellular Biology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Parker, Roy R.
Committee Chair:
Parker, Roy R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleIdentification and Characterization of Novel Proteins and Pathways for mRNA Degradation and Quality Control in Saccharomyces Cerevisiaeen_US
dc.creatorDoma, Meenakshi Kshirsagaren_US
dc.contributor.authorDoma, Meenakshi Kshirsagaren_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn eukaryotes, mRNA decay pathways are important for cellular response to various physiological conditions and also function in co-translational quality control systems that target translationally aberrant mRNAs for degradation. My work on identification and characterization of novel components and pathways of mRNA degradation and quality control in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is summarized below.I have identified Edc3p as a novel protein important for mRNA decay. Deletion of Edc3p leads to a defect in mRNA decay in strains deficient in decapping enzymes and, in combination with a block to the 3' to 5' decay pathway, causes exaggerated growth defects and synthetic lethality. An Edc3p-GFP fusion protein localizes in processing bodies, which are specialized cytoplasmic foci containing decapping proteins. Together, these observations indicate that Edc3p directly interacts with the decapping complex to stimulate the mRNA decapping rate.Quality control during mRNA translation is critical for regulation of gene expression. My work shows that yeast mRNAs with defects in translation elongation, due to strong translational pauses, are recognized and targeted for degradation via an endonucleolytic cleavage in a novel process referred to as No-Go Decay (NGD). The cellular mRNA decay machinery degrades the 5' and 3' cleavage products produced by NGD. NGD is translation-dependent, occurs in a range of mRNAs and can be induced by a variety of elongation pauses. These results indicate NGD may occur at some rate in response to any stalled ribosome.I also show that two highly conserved proteins, Dom34p and Hbs1p, homologous to the eukaryotic release factors eRF1 and eRF3 respectively, are required for NGD. Further characterization of the No-Go decay pathway indicates that Dom34p function during NGD is conserved across species. Identification of RPS30, a small ribosomal protein as a trans-acting factor during NGD suggests that the ribosome may have a novel role during NGD. Other experiments indicate that the No-Go decay pathway may cross talk with the unfolded protein response pathway. The identification of No-Go decay as a novel quality control pathway during translation elongation supports the existence of a global cellular mechanism for maintenance of translational quality control.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectmRNA decayen_US
dc.subjectTranslation elongationen_US
dc.subjectRibosomal stallen_US
dc.subjectPost transcriptional control of gene expressionen_US
dc.subjectQuality controlen_US
dc.subjectmRNA surveillanceen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMolecular & Cellular Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorParker, Roy R.en_US
dc.contributor.chairParker, Roy R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDieckman, Carolen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWard, Samen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWeinert, Teden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBosco, Gioen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1622en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137356134en_US
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