Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195675
Title:
Dark Matter: Origin, Detection, and Collider Implications
Author:
Dolle, Ethan Michael
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Cosmological observations have precisely measured the amount of cold dark matter (CDM) in the Universe. The best fit value corresponds to around 23% of the Universe being composed of CDM. Nothing in the Standard Model (SM) is able to account for this cold dark matter. This provides unambiguous evidence for physics beyond the SM. From particle physics, the hierarchy between the electroweak and Planck scales within the SM provides motivation to consider new physics beyond the SM. In this thesis, I investigated the origin of CDM, analyzed various prospects for indirect detection, and studied its collider implications.We focused on two such models: the Left Right Twin Higgs (LRTH) model and the Inert Doublet model (IDM). Both of these models contain a neutral scalar that is stable and a good CDM candidate. We performed a CDM analysis, and identified regions of parameter space that can account for all of the CDM in the Universe.CDM can become trapped around massive objects such as the Sun, Earth, and galactic center. Over time, these CDM particles can annihilate to produce neutrinos and photons. Within the IDM framework, we analyzed the neutrino signal from the Sun and Earth and the photon signal from the galactic center.Due to the nature of new particles within the IDM, there are implications for signals at high energy colliders, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). These particles are produced and can subsequently decay to CDM, jets, and leptons. Within the framework of the IDM, we performed a dilepton signal analysis at the LHC.There exists a synergy between particle physics and cosmology. The study of the interplay between these two fields could provide valuable insights and bring a better understanding of Nature within our grasp. It is an exciting time for physics.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
dark matter
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Physics; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Su, Shufang
Committee Chair:
Su, Shufang

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleDark Matter: Origin, Detection, and Collider Implicationsen_US
dc.creatorDolle, Ethan Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorDolle, Ethan Michaelen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractCosmological observations have precisely measured the amount of cold dark matter (CDM) in the Universe. The best fit value corresponds to around 23% of the Universe being composed of CDM. Nothing in the Standard Model (SM) is able to account for this cold dark matter. This provides unambiguous evidence for physics beyond the SM. From particle physics, the hierarchy between the electroweak and Planck scales within the SM provides motivation to consider new physics beyond the SM. In this thesis, I investigated the origin of CDM, analyzed various prospects for indirect detection, and studied its collider implications.We focused on two such models: the Left Right Twin Higgs (LRTH) model and the Inert Doublet model (IDM). Both of these models contain a neutral scalar that is stable and a good CDM candidate. We performed a CDM analysis, and identified regions of parameter space that can account for all of the CDM in the Universe.CDM can become trapped around massive objects such as the Sun, Earth, and galactic center. Over time, these CDM particles can annihilate to produce neutrinos and photons. Within the IDM framework, we analyzed the neutrino signal from the Sun and Earth and the photon signal from the galactic center.Due to the nature of new particles within the IDM, there are implications for signals at high energy colliders, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). These particles are produced and can subsequently decay to CDM, jets, and leptons. Within the framework of the IDM, we performed a dilepton signal analysis at the LHC.There exists a synergy between particle physics and cosmology. The study of the interplay between these two fields could provide valuable insights and bring a better understanding of Nature within our grasp. It is an exciting time for physics.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectdark matteren_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysicsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSu, Shufangen_US
dc.contributor.chairSu, Shufangen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberToussaint, Douglasen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShupe, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeemembervan Kolck, Ubirajaraen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10748en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659753573en_US
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