The Influence of Collegial Communication on Faculty Perceptions of Departmental Climate

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195659
Title:
The Influence of Collegial Communication on Faculty Perceptions of Departmental Climate
Author:
Anderson, Judith L.
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
To date, very little research on task-oriented groups has focused on relational communication, the verbal and non-verbal messages that members exchange in negotiating their interrelationships within a group. The purpose of the present study was to test a new, interdisciplinary model of how relational messages that faculty members receive from colleagues predict their global assessment of departmental support. A new Relational Message scale was employed in an online survey completed by 262 faculty members at the University of Arizona. Results of multilevel modeling analyses show that positive and negative relational messages received in collegial interaction were associated with 1) individuals' sense of relative competence and belongingness in their departments, 2) the extent to which gender is salient in their interactions with colleagues, 3) their level of identification with their departments, and 4) perceived departmental support. Female faculty members reported receipt of more negative messages about their professional competence, more negative feelings associated with interaction, more awareness of gender in interaction, and perceptions of lower departmental support than males. It was also found that both male and female respondents associated positive relational messages significantly more with male colleagues than expected, based on gender representation in their departments. No inter-departmental differences in relational communication experiences were found. Implications and limitations of the study, as well as future directions for research, are discussed.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Communication; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Harwood, Jake

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleThe Influence of Collegial Communication on Faculty Perceptions of Departmental Climateen_US
dc.creatorAnderson, Judith L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Judith L.en_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractTo date, very little research on task-oriented groups has focused on relational communication, the verbal and non-verbal messages that members exchange in negotiating their interrelationships within a group. The purpose of the present study was to test a new, interdisciplinary model of how relational messages that faculty members receive from colleagues predict their global assessment of departmental support. A new Relational Message scale was employed in an online survey completed by 262 faculty members at the University of Arizona. Results of multilevel modeling analyses show that positive and negative relational messages received in collegial interaction were associated with 1) individuals' sense of relative competence and belongingness in their departments, 2) the extent to which gender is salient in their interactions with colleagues, 3) their level of identification with their departments, and 4) perceived departmental support. Female faculty members reported receipt of more negative messages about their professional competence, more negative feelings associated with interaction, more awareness of gender in interaction, and perceptions of lower departmental support than males. It was also found that both male and female respondents associated positive relational messages significantly more with male colleagues than expected, based on gender representation in their departments. No inter-departmental differences in relational communication experiences were found. Implications and limitations of the study, as well as future directions for research, are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairHarwood, Jakeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHarwood, Jakeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBonito, Josephen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDues, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchmader, Tonien_US
dc.identifier.proquest2678en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659749682en_US
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