SPANISH HERITAGE LANGUAGE SOCIALIZATION PRACTICES OF A FAMILY OF MEXICAN ORIGIN

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195638
Title:
SPANISH HERITAGE LANGUAGE SOCIALIZATION PRACTICES OF A FAMILY OF MEXICAN ORIGIN
Author:
Delgado, Maria Rocio
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This ethnographic case study describes the patterns of language socialization and literacy/biliteracy practices and the patterns of language choice and language use of a Spanish heritage bilingual family of Mexican origin from the participant perspective, the emic view, and the research perspective, an etic view. This analysis attempts to broaden the knowledge of how Mexican origin families use language at home by demonstrating how literacy/biliteracy practices (i.e., reading, writing and talk/conversation), language choice (i.e., Spanish, English, code-switching (CS)) and language use (i.e., domains) contribute to reinforce, develop or hinder the use of Spanish as a heritage language. Using ethnographic methodology, this study analyzes the participants' naturally occurring language interactions. Socialization and language learning are seen as intricately interwoven processes in which language learners participate actively.The analysis and discussion is presented in two sections: 1) language socialization in conjunction with literacy practices, and 2) language socialization in conjunction with language choice and CS. Language choice and CS are analyzed by means of conversation analysis theory (CA): the analysis of language sequences of the participants' conversation. The description of the domains (i.e., what participants do with each language and the way they use language) constitutes the basis for the analysis.The findings of this study show that language shift to English is imminent in an environment of reduced contact with parents, siblings, and the community of the heritage language group. Understanding which literacy practices are part of the everyday life of Hispanic households is relevant to the implementation of classroom literacy practices.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
biliteracy; code-switching; language maintenance; language shift; language socialization; literacy
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Second Language Acquisition & Teaching; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rubinstein-Avila, Eliane B
Committee Chair:
Rubinstein-Avila, Eliane B

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleSPANISH HERITAGE LANGUAGE SOCIALIZATION PRACTICES OF A FAMILY OF MEXICAN ORIGINen_US
dc.creatorDelgado, Maria Rocioen_US
dc.contributor.authorDelgado, Maria Rocioen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis ethnographic case study describes the patterns of language socialization and literacy/biliteracy practices and the patterns of language choice and language use of a Spanish heritage bilingual family of Mexican origin from the participant perspective, the emic view, and the research perspective, an etic view. This analysis attempts to broaden the knowledge of how Mexican origin families use language at home by demonstrating how literacy/biliteracy practices (i.e., reading, writing and talk/conversation), language choice (i.e., Spanish, English, code-switching (CS)) and language use (i.e., domains) contribute to reinforce, develop or hinder the use of Spanish as a heritage language. Using ethnographic methodology, this study analyzes the participants' naturally occurring language interactions. Socialization and language learning are seen as intricately interwoven processes in which language learners participate actively.The analysis and discussion is presented in two sections: 1) language socialization in conjunction with literacy practices, and 2) language socialization in conjunction with language choice and CS. Language choice and CS are analyzed by means of conversation analysis theory (CA): the analysis of language sequences of the participants' conversation. The description of the domains (i.e., what participants do with each language and the way they use language) constitutes the basis for the analysis.The findings of this study show that language shift to English is imminent in an environment of reduced contact with parents, siblings, and the community of the heritage language group. Understanding which literacy practices are part of the everyday life of Hispanic households is relevant to the implementation of classroom literacy practices.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectbiliteracyen_US
dc.subjectcode-switchingen_US
dc.subjectlanguage maintenanceen_US
dc.subjectlanguage shiften_US
dc.subjectlanguage socializationen_US
dc.subjectliteracyen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSecond Language Acquisition & Teachingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRubinstein-Avila, Eliane Ben_US
dc.contributor.chairRubinstein-Avila, Eliane Ben_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCarvalho, Ana Men_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReyes, Ilianaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRubinstein-Avila, Eliane Ben_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWaugh, Linda Ren_US
dc.identifier.proquest10285en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659750906en_US
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