Examining Distance Education in Teaching Clinical Counseling Skills to Rehabilitation Counselors-in-Training

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195630
Title:
Examining Distance Education in Teaching Clinical Counseling Skills to Rehabilitation Counselors-in-Training
Author:
Degiorgio, Lisa
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This exploratory study was designed to examine counseling skill acquisition for Rehabilitation Counseling education students enrolled in a distance education Practicum I course. The course utilized interactive television (ITV), Desire 2 Learn (D2L), a course management system, and some formalized group meetings for curriculum delivery. Students were asked to provide two audio recordings that served as pre-test and post-test measures of counseling skills. Recordings were analyzed by two evaluators. In addition to the recordings, students completed two survey instruments, an initial demographic questionnaire and a survey of attitudes towards the use of technology in the course that was completed along with the post-test recording. A comparison of pre-test and post-test means on the audio recordings revealed no significant change in counseling skills for students enrolled in this course. There was an increase in the number of empathetic responses, clarifying statements, paraphrasing, questions and closing statements on the post-test recordings but a decrease in attending responses and opening statements. Survey findings indicated that students perceived distance education to be an effective use of their time and improved the quality of course interactions. Students also reported that technology made interacting with their peers difficult and somewhat impersonal. Approximately half of the students agreed that they were comfortable with the course technology. A majority to students indicated they would have preferred a traditional approach to learning counseling skills. These findings have implications for counseling programs currently utilizing ITV or webconferencing to deliver clinical skills courses. It may have broader implications for other clinical skills training programs delivering training via other distance education modalities.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Distance Education; ITV; Quasi-experimental; Rehabilitation
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Rehabilitation; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Kampfe, Charlene M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleExamining Distance Education in Teaching Clinical Counseling Skills to Rehabilitation Counselors-in-Trainingen_US
dc.creatorDegiorgio, Lisaen_US
dc.contributor.authorDegiorgio, Lisaen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis exploratory study was designed to examine counseling skill acquisition for Rehabilitation Counseling education students enrolled in a distance education Practicum I course. The course utilized interactive television (ITV), Desire 2 Learn (D2L), a course management system, and some formalized group meetings for curriculum delivery. Students were asked to provide two audio recordings that served as pre-test and post-test measures of counseling skills. Recordings were analyzed by two evaluators. In addition to the recordings, students completed two survey instruments, an initial demographic questionnaire and a survey of attitudes towards the use of technology in the course that was completed along with the post-test recording. A comparison of pre-test and post-test means on the audio recordings revealed no significant change in counseling skills for students enrolled in this course. There was an increase in the number of empathetic responses, clarifying statements, paraphrasing, questions and closing statements on the post-test recordings but a decrease in attending responses and opening statements. Survey findings indicated that students perceived distance education to be an effective use of their time and improved the quality of course interactions. Students also reported that technology made interacting with their peers difficult and somewhat impersonal. Approximately half of the students agreed that they were comfortable with the course technology. A majority to students indicated they would have preferred a traditional approach to learning counseling skills. These findings have implications for counseling programs currently utilizing ITV or webconferencing to deliver clinical skills courses. It may have broader implications for other clinical skills training programs delivering training via other distance education modalities.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectDistance Educationen_US
dc.subjectITVen_US
dc.subjectQuasi-experimentalen_US
dc.subjectRehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairKampfe, Charlene M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSales, Amos P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMoore, Susan F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCallahan, Philip E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest10302en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659750923en_US
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