Beyond Community: "Global" Conservation Networks and "Local" Organization in Tanzania and Zanzibar

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195624
Title:
Beyond Community: "Global" Conservation Networks and "Local" Organization in Tanzania and Zanzibar
Author:
Dean, Erin
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation explores the complex structures and diverse experiences of globalization through the specific analytical lens of community-based natural resource management (CBNRM). CBNRM is an undertaking which is fundamentally local but also integrally connected to transnational conservation ideology and national structures of authority. While recent critiques of community-based conservation projects have challenged the universal efficacy of the approach, CBNRM continues to be a ubiquitous conservation paradigm and to provide lingering hope for local empowerment through resource management. Focusing on two community-based conservation groups formed in Tanzania and Zanzibar, this dissertation looks at the experience of local groups attempting to engage with broader national or international conservation networks by focusing on three tropes of globalization theory: intersections between traditional ecological knowledge and western science, the relationship between civil society and the state, and the specific mechanisms for local engagement with national and global entities. The community groups in this study use dynamic and adaptive strategies to channel resources into their communities. However, they also face significant structural constraints, many of which reveal the neocolonial effects of transnational conservation ideology. This work explores both the factors limiting or manipulating local participation in resource management and the strategies used by these two community-based conservation groups to ensure their participation in spite of those limitations.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
community-based conservation; globalization; traditional ecological knowledge; Tanzania
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Anthropology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Austin, Diane E.
Committee Chair:
Austin, Diane E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleBeyond Community: "Global" Conservation Networks and "Local" Organization in Tanzania and Zanzibaren_US
dc.creatorDean, Erinen_US
dc.contributor.authorDean, Erinen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation explores the complex structures and diverse experiences of globalization through the specific analytical lens of community-based natural resource management (CBNRM). CBNRM is an undertaking which is fundamentally local but also integrally connected to transnational conservation ideology and national structures of authority. While recent critiques of community-based conservation projects have challenged the universal efficacy of the approach, CBNRM continues to be a ubiquitous conservation paradigm and to provide lingering hope for local empowerment through resource management. Focusing on two community-based conservation groups formed in Tanzania and Zanzibar, this dissertation looks at the experience of local groups attempting to engage with broader national or international conservation networks by focusing on three tropes of globalization theory: intersections between traditional ecological knowledge and western science, the relationship between civil society and the state, and the specific mechanisms for local engagement with national and global entities. The community groups in this study use dynamic and adaptive strategies to channel resources into their communities. However, they also face significant structural constraints, many of which reveal the neocolonial effects of transnational conservation ideology. This work explores both the factors limiting or manipulating local participation in resource management and the strategies used by these two community-based conservation groups to ensure their participation in spite of those limitations.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectcommunity-based conservationen_US
dc.subjectglobalizationen_US
dc.subjecttraditional ecological knowledgeen_US
dc.subjectTanzaniaen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorAustin, Diane E.en_US
dc.contributor.chairAustin, Diane E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBaro, Mamadouen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLansing, Steveen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShaw, Williamen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMyers, Garthen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2395en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659748286en_US
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