REPRESENTATIONS OF LITERACY: THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH AND THE IMMIGRANT EXPERIENCE IN EARLY TWENTIETH-CENTURY AMERICA

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195616
Title:
REPRESENTATIONS OF LITERACY: THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH AND THE IMMIGRANT EXPERIENCE IN EARLY TWENTIETH-CENTURY AMERICA
Author:
Dayton, Amy Elizabeth
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The study contributes to the growing body of research that examines the meanings and practices of literacy in community settings. While the study sheds some light on the history of community-based literacy learning, it is also a project in rhetorical analysis. It traces the influence of public discourse and beliefs about literacy on the teaching of English to non-native speakers, focusing on the Progressive Era (1890-1920), a time of major social and educational change. Turn-of-the-century educators and members of the public believed that literacy was in a state of decline, and immigrants were often blamed. Public debate about literacy was marked by an acute sense of crisis exacerbated by economic unease and rapid social and political change. In this atmosphere of change and anxiety, the public called on English teachers to assimilate immigrants by bringing them in line with cultural norms, teaching them patriotism, and preparing them to be efficient workers. In response to public pressure, some educators embraced a vision of a monolingual society and adopted a pedagogy of assimilation. As Americanization programs emerged in large numbers in the 1910s, the goals and curricula often reflected this vision. However, not all educators embraced the assimilation model. Some educators and immigrant writers argued for the need for a pedagogy rooted in students' community lives and individual needs, with the potential to contribute toward a more democratic society for all.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
literacy; immigration; language policy; history
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Rhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of English; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Miller, Thomas P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleREPRESENTATIONS OF LITERACY: THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH AND THE IMMIGRANT EXPERIENCE IN EARLY TWENTIETH-CENTURY AMERICAen_US
dc.creatorDayton, Amy Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorDayton, Amy Elizabethen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe study contributes to the growing body of research that examines the meanings and practices of literacy in community settings. While the study sheds some light on the history of community-based literacy learning, it is also a project in rhetorical analysis. It traces the influence of public discourse and beliefs about literacy on the teaching of English to non-native speakers, focusing on the Progressive Era (1890-1920), a time of major social and educational change. Turn-of-the-century educators and members of the public believed that literacy was in a state of decline, and immigrants were often blamed. Public debate about literacy was marked by an acute sense of crisis exacerbated by economic unease and rapid social and political change. In this atmosphere of change and anxiety, the public called on English teachers to assimilate immigrants by bringing them in line with cultural norms, teaching them patriotism, and preparing them to be efficient workers. In response to public pressure, some educators embraced a vision of a monolingual society and adopted a pedagogy of assimilation. As Americanization programs emerged in large numbers in the 1910s, the goals and curricula often reflected this vision. However, not all educators embraced the assimilation model. Some educators and immigrant writers argued for the need for a pedagogy rooted in students' community lives and individual needs, with the potential to contribute toward a more democratic society for all.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectliteracyen_US
dc.subjectimmigrationen_US
dc.subjectlanguage policyen_US
dc.subjecthistoryen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of Englishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairMiller, Thomas P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEnos, Theresaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWarnock, Johnen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1264en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137354695en_US
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