The Effects of Coalition Building on Public Law 93-531: The Navajo and Hopi Land Settlement Act of 1974

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195611
Title:
The Effects of Coalition Building on Public Law 93-531: The Navajo and Hopi Land Settlement Act of 1974
Author:
Davis, James Joe
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation presents a case study of policy formation this is intended to illuminate certain key features of the Federal-Tribal relationship. The federal law under examination is Public Law 93-531: The Navajo and Hopi Land Settlement Act of 1974. The federal law represents an effort to resolve a long-standing land dispute between members of the Navajo and Hopi Tribes. Federal intervention was viewed necessary by some people/groups since the tribal governments could not come to a resolution about land possession, surface/subsurface rights, and general land usage of the dispute area. Case study research is used to frame the study, while coalition politics explores and analyzes the issues of policy formation and policy resolution.I conclude that coalition politics occurred at different levels in the policy environment, while effecting each coalition partner differently. The study provides a multi-level analysis which considers the involvement of Federal and Tribal governments.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Political Science; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Garcia, John A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleThe Effects of Coalition Building on Public Law 93-531: The Navajo and Hopi Land Settlement Act of 1974en_US
dc.creatorDavis, James Joeen_US
dc.contributor.authorDavis, James Joeen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation presents a case study of policy formation this is intended to illuminate certain key features of the Federal-Tribal relationship. The federal law under examination is Public Law 93-531: The Navajo and Hopi Land Settlement Act of 1974. The federal law represents an effort to resolve a long-standing land dispute between members of the Navajo and Hopi Tribes. Federal intervention was viewed necessary by some people/groups since the tribal governments could not come to a resolution about land possession, surface/subsurface rights, and general land usage of the dispute area. Case study research is used to frame the study, while coalition politics explores and analyzes the issues of policy formation and policy resolution.I conclude that coalition politics occurred at different levels in the policy environment, while effecting each coalition partner differently. The study provides a multi-level analysis which considers the involvement of Federal and Tribal governments.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairGarcia, John A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGarcia, John A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberClarke, Jeanne Nienaberen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHolm, Tomen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCamacho, David E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1278en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137354774en_US
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