Affective Intelligence, The Political Persuasion Process, And Outcome Intent: An Experimental Test

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195585
Title:
Affective Intelligence, The Political Persuasion Process, And Outcome Intent: An Experimental Test
Author:
Curran, Michael D.
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Political communication scholars aim to understand the effect of messages on political attitudes and behavior. Past scholarship has identified three sources of influence in forming attitudes and behavior: affective, cognitive, and personality factors. While much attention has been paid to the impact of each single factor, little research has attempted to integrate them. Using the Affective Intelligence model as a theoretical point of departure (Marcus, & MacKuen, 1993; Marcus et al., 2000), this dissertation explored the simultaneous--and, in some cases, interactive relationships--between these attitudinal and behavioral influences. An experiment was conducted to answer three questions: first, do the causal claims made by Marcus and colleagues regarding the impact of emotion on political attitudes and behavior hold-up outside the realm of survey research? Second, what role does cognitive appraisals of messages play in the political persuasion process? Finally, does political efficacy moderate the relationships between induced emotional response, cognitive appraisals of messages, and political attitudes and behavior? Alternatively stated, does political efficacy link these factors together?The results of this study should be carefully interpreted as the causal instrument underlying manipulated attitudes was not transparent. The desired experimental manipulation--induced anxiety--was not unidimensional. While inductions did induce negative affect, they simultaneously induced positive affect. Within the confines of this document, this result is discussed at length and numerous possible explanations are offered.Structural equation modeling indicated that affect had a small impact on political attitudes and behavior. Likewise, the impact of cognitive appraisals of messages on attitudes and behavior was small. Alternatively, internal efficacy had a substantial main effect--not an interactive effect--on political attitudes and behavior.In summary, the results demonstrated the power of personality in predicting political attitudes and behavior. By trait, some individuals are more politically efficacious than others. Those with higher levels of internal efficacy tended to identify experimental messages as relevant to the attitudes they held, indicating that confidence in one's ability to comprehend politics and understand political happenings leads to identifying message content as applicable or appropriate. Additionally, these same individuals were likely to seek out more information about politics.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Affective Intelligence SEM 2nd Order Factor
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Communication; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hullett, Craig R.
Committee Chair:
Hullett, Craig R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleAffective Intelligence, The Political Persuasion Process, And Outcome Intent: An Experimental Testen_US
dc.creatorCurran, Michael D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCurran, Michael D.en_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPolitical communication scholars aim to understand the effect of messages on political attitudes and behavior. Past scholarship has identified three sources of influence in forming attitudes and behavior: affective, cognitive, and personality factors. While much attention has been paid to the impact of each single factor, little research has attempted to integrate them. Using the Affective Intelligence model as a theoretical point of departure (Marcus, & MacKuen, 1993; Marcus et al., 2000), this dissertation explored the simultaneous--and, in some cases, interactive relationships--between these attitudinal and behavioral influences. An experiment was conducted to answer three questions: first, do the causal claims made by Marcus and colleagues regarding the impact of emotion on political attitudes and behavior hold-up outside the realm of survey research? Second, what role does cognitive appraisals of messages play in the political persuasion process? Finally, does political efficacy moderate the relationships between induced emotional response, cognitive appraisals of messages, and political attitudes and behavior? Alternatively stated, does political efficacy link these factors together?The results of this study should be carefully interpreted as the causal instrument underlying manipulated attitudes was not transparent. The desired experimental manipulation--induced anxiety--was not unidimensional. While inductions did induce negative affect, they simultaneously induced positive affect. Within the confines of this document, this result is discussed at length and numerous possible explanations are offered.Structural equation modeling indicated that affect had a small impact on political attitudes and behavior. Likewise, the impact of cognitive appraisals of messages on attitudes and behavior was small. Alternatively, internal efficacy had a substantial main effect--not an interactive effect--on political attitudes and behavior.In summary, the results demonstrated the power of personality in predicting political attitudes and behavior. By trait, some individuals are more politically efficacious than others. Those with higher levels of internal efficacy tended to identify experimental messages as relevant to the attitudes they held, indicating that confidence in one's ability to comprehend politics and understand political happenings leads to identifying message content as applicable or appropriate. Additionally, these same individuals were likely to seek out more information about politics.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectAffective Intelligence SEM 2nd Order Factoren_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHullett, Craig R.en_US
dc.contributor.chairHullett, Craig R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSegrin, Chrisen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMastro, Danaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2903en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659749552en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.