Physicochemical aspects of colloid deposition in a rotating disk system: implications for contaminant transport

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195568
Title:
Physicochemical aspects of colloid deposition in a rotating disk system: implications for contaminant transport
Author:
Cramer, Michael Christian
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Application of conventional theory of transport and deposition to small particles or large colloids, on the order of 1 micron in diameter, has received surprisingly little attention in colloid science. While the favorable deposition of colloidal particles ( < 0.5 micron diameter) has repeatedly been shown to agree with the Smoluchowski-Levich approximation for a convective-diffusion process, larger particles are known to deviate from this solute-like mass transfer behavior. The rotating disk, used in the experiments performed in this work, is a model experimental system that has been employed in the past to de-convolute and quantify the mechanisms of particle transport. Experimental evidence shows that particle transport to the rotating disk deviates from the predictions of the complete three-dimensional convective-diffusion equation, including hydrodynamic and surface-surface interaction forces, in that non-uniform deposition is observed over the surface of the disk. Fluid inertial effects, observed to be significant in capillary flow, have been suggested in the literature as an explanation of non-uniform deposition on the rotating disk. Calculations performed in this work show that while inertial lift forces are significant, they are not the dominant cause of non-uniform deposition. Instead, hydrodynamic blocking of available deposition surface area is shown to accurately describe experimental deposition profiles. The effect of particle size on surface area exclusion and hydrodynamic scattering are separately assessed to demonstrate that the blocking model is not only phenomenologically accurate, but also an important part of the mechanistic description of transport in the rotating disk system.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
colloid; enhanced transport; rotating disk; particle deposition
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Chemical Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sáez, Eduardo
Committee Chair:
Sáez, Eduardo

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titlePhysicochemical aspects of colloid deposition in a rotating disk system: implications for contaminant transporten_US
dc.creatorCramer, Michael Christianen_US
dc.contributor.authorCramer, Michael Christianen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractApplication of conventional theory of transport and deposition to small particles or large colloids, on the order of 1 micron in diameter, has received surprisingly little attention in colloid science. While the favorable deposition of colloidal particles ( < 0.5 micron diameter) has repeatedly been shown to agree with the Smoluchowski-Levich approximation for a convective-diffusion process, larger particles are known to deviate from this solute-like mass transfer behavior. The rotating disk, used in the experiments performed in this work, is a model experimental system that has been employed in the past to de-convolute and quantify the mechanisms of particle transport. Experimental evidence shows that particle transport to the rotating disk deviates from the predictions of the complete three-dimensional convective-diffusion equation, including hydrodynamic and surface-surface interaction forces, in that non-uniform deposition is observed over the surface of the disk. Fluid inertial effects, observed to be significant in capillary flow, have been suggested in the literature as an explanation of non-uniform deposition on the rotating disk. Calculations performed in this work show that while inertial lift forces are significant, they are not the dominant cause of non-uniform deposition. Instead, hydrodynamic blocking of available deposition surface area is shown to accurately describe experimental deposition profiles. The effect of particle size on surface area exclusion and hydrodynamic scattering are separately assessed to demonstrate that the blocking model is not only phenomenologically accurate, but also an important part of the mechanistic description of transport in the rotating disk system.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectcolloiden_US
dc.subjectenhanced transporten_US
dc.subjectrotating disken_US
dc.subjectparticle depositionen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSáez, Eduardoen_US
dc.contributor.chairSáez, Eduardoen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSáez, Eduardoen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEla, Wendellen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBaygents, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZelinksi, Brianen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1208en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137354377en_US
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