Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195559
Title:
Acoustic Resonance in a Cavity under a Subsonic Flow
Author:
Alvarez, Jose Oliverio
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Acoustic resonances leading to high unsteady pressure levels may occur in flow past cavities. The resonance involves a coupling between the downstream-propagating instability wave on the shear layer spanning the open face of the cavity, and acoustic waves propagating within and external to the cavity. These elements of the disturbance field are coupled by the scattering processes that occur at the upstream and downstream ends of the cavity. We develop a theoretical prediction method that combines propagation models in the central region of the cavity with scattering models for the end regions. In our analyses of the scattering processes at the cavity ends, the square-corner geometry is treated exactly, by a method employing the Wiener--Hopf technique. The shear layer is approximated as a vortex sheet in the edge scattering analyses, but finite shear-layer thickness is accounted for in analyzing the propagation of the waves along the length of the cavity. The global analysis leads to a prediction for the resonant frequencies which has a form similar to the Rossiter formula, but contains no empirical constants. In addition to prediction of the frequency, our theory determines the temporal growth or decay rate of each mode. Finally, our theory also predicts the influence of secondary feedback loops involving other components of the unsteady field. Comparisons of the predictions with existing experimental data are made.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Aeroacoustics; Applied Mathematics; Cavity Acoustics
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Applied Mathematics; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kerschen, Edward J
Committee Chair:
Kerschen, Edward J

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleAcoustic Resonance in a Cavity under a Subsonic Flowen_US
dc.creatorAlvarez, Jose Oliverioen_US
dc.contributor.authorAlvarez, Jose Oliverioen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAcoustic resonances leading to high unsteady pressure levels may occur in flow past cavities. The resonance involves a coupling between the downstream-propagating instability wave on the shear layer spanning the open face of the cavity, and acoustic waves propagating within and external to the cavity. These elements of the disturbance field are coupled by the scattering processes that occur at the upstream and downstream ends of the cavity. We develop a theoretical prediction method that combines propagation models in the central region of the cavity with scattering models for the end regions. In our analyses of the scattering processes at the cavity ends, the square-corner geometry is treated exactly, by a method employing the Wiener--Hopf technique. The shear layer is approximated as a vortex sheet in the edge scattering analyses, but finite shear-layer thickness is accounted for in analyzing the propagation of the waves along the length of the cavity. The global analysis leads to a prediction for the resonant frequencies which has a form similar to the Rossiter formula, but contains no empirical constants. In addition to prediction of the frequency, our theory determines the temporal growth or decay rate of each mode. Finally, our theory also predicts the influence of secondary feedback loops involving other components of the unsteady field. Comparisons of the predictions with existing experimental data are made.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectAeroacousticsen_US
dc.subjectApplied Mathematicsen_US
dc.subjectCavity Acousticsen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineApplied Mathematicsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKerschen, Edward Jen_US
dc.contributor.chairKerschen, Edward Jen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTabor, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBayly, Bruceen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTumin, Anatolien_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBalsa, Thomasen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1091en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137353935en_US
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