Understanding State Responses to the HIV/AIDS Crisis in Sub-Saharan Africa

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195543
Title:
Understanding State Responses to the HIV/AIDS Crisis in Sub-Saharan Africa
Author:
Coopamah, Padmini Devi
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation seeks to understand the factors that influence government responses to HIV/AIDS among sub-Saharan African countries. Specifically, I hypothesize that 1) under certain circumstances, countries with democratic institutions are more likely to fight the epidemic aggressively and 2) there are multiple pathways to strong government action. By examining government performance in 29 sub-Saharan African countries, I find strong support for both hypotheses. A case study of Botswana shows that various aspects of a democratic society, from the competitiveness of the political arena to an active civil society, shape government responses to HIV/AIDS.This research has both theoretical and practical implications. It contributes to the existing knowledge about the effects of democracy on public well-being by highlighting that, even in regions where democratic institutions may not be well-established, their dynamics are still powerful enough to encourage governments to adopt policies that benefit their populations. Additionally, it expands our understanding of HIV/AIDS policy-making in sub-Saharan Africa and in other areas of the world by specifying the different environments which lead governments to be aggressive in addressing the epidemic, a finding of interest to those involved in the field of development.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
AIDS policy; equifinality; Sub-Saharan Africa
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Political Science; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kurzer, Paulette
Committee Chair:
Kurzer, Paulette

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleUnderstanding State Responses to the HIV/AIDS Crisis in Sub-Saharan Africaen_US
dc.creatorCoopamah, Padmini Devien_US
dc.contributor.authorCoopamah, Padmini Devien_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation seeks to understand the factors that influence government responses to HIV/AIDS among sub-Saharan African countries. Specifically, I hypothesize that 1) under certain circumstances, countries with democratic institutions are more likely to fight the epidemic aggressively and 2) there are multiple pathways to strong government action. By examining government performance in 29 sub-Saharan African countries, I find strong support for both hypotheses. A case study of Botswana shows that various aspects of a democratic society, from the competitiveness of the political arena to an active civil society, shape government responses to HIV/AIDS.This research has both theoretical and practical implications. It contributes to the existing knowledge about the effects of democracy on public well-being by highlighting that, even in regions where democratic institutions may not be well-established, their dynamics are still powerful enough to encourage governments to adopt policies that benefit their populations. Additionally, it expands our understanding of HIV/AIDS policy-making in sub-Saharan Africa and in other areas of the world by specifying the different environments which lead governments to be aggressive in addressing the epidemic, a finding of interest to those involved in the field of development.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectAIDS policyen_US
dc.subjectequifinalityen_US
dc.subjectSub-Saharan Africaen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKurzer, Pauletteen_US
dc.contributor.chairKurzer, Pauletteen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWillerton, John P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGoertz, Garyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10636en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659753378en_US
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