Are All Sources Equal? Examining the Roles of Aging and the Frontal Lobes on Multiple Types of Source Memory Using a Repeated-Measures Design

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195539
Title:
Are All Sources Equal? Examining the Roles of Aging and the Frontal Lobes on Multiple Types of Source Memory Using a Repeated-Measures Design
Author:
Cook, Shaun P
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This paper reports a series of experiments designed to compare memory for multiple kinds of source information in young and older adults. The older adults in these studies were classified as having well or poorly functioning frontal lobes. In EXPERIMENTS 1-3, three different sources that provided independent cues to item information were examined using a repeated-measures design. In particular, participants' memory for voice source information, spatial source information, and temporal source information was tested in separate blocks. The results indicated that the performance of both young and older adults depended upon the type of source tested: Voice source memory was superior to spatial source and temporal source memory, which did not differ. There was also an age effect that was mediated by frontal functioning. Only the low frontal older adults showed impairments in source memory. High frontal older adults were equivalent to young. In EXPERIMENT 4, sources that provided redundant cues to item information were investigated. Voice sources and spatial sources were perfectly matched during encoding such that Voice A always came from Location 1 and Voice B always came from Location 2. When sources provided redundant information in this manner, young and high frontal older adults improved their spatial source memory by making use of redundant voice information, whereas the low frontal older adults not only performed more poorly than both young and high frontal older adults, but were unable to benefit from the redundancy. No differences in item memory were found. The findings were interpreted in terms of the executive and working memory functions involved in the integration of various contextual elements of an experience with its content.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Source Memory; Aging; Frontal Lobes; Repeated-Measures Design; Multiple; Redundant Sources
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Glisky, Elizabeth L
Committee Chair:
Glisky, Elizabeth L

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleAre All Sources Equal? Examining the Roles of Aging and the Frontal Lobes on Multiple Types of Source Memory Using a Repeated-Measures Designen_US
dc.creatorCook, Shaun Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorCook, Shaun Pen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper reports a series of experiments designed to compare memory for multiple kinds of source information in young and older adults. The older adults in these studies were classified as having well or poorly functioning frontal lobes. In EXPERIMENTS 1-3, three different sources that provided independent cues to item information were examined using a repeated-measures design. In particular, participants' memory for voice source information, spatial source information, and temporal source information was tested in separate blocks. The results indicated that the performance of both young and older adults depended upon the type of source tested: Voice source memory was superior to spatial source and temporal source memory, which did not differ. There was also an age effect that was mediated by frontal functioning. Only the low frontal older adults showed impairments in source memory. High frontal older adults were equivalent to young. In EXPERIMENT 4, sources that provided redundant cues to item information were investigated. Voice sources and spatial sources were perfectly matched during encoding such that Voice A always came from Location 1 and Voice B always came from Location 2. When sources provided redundant information in this manner, young and high frontal older adults improved their spatial source memory by making use of redundant voice information, whereas the low frontal older adults not only performed more poorly than both young and high frontal older adults, but were unable to benefit from the redundancy. No differences in item memory were found. The findings were interpreted in terms of the executive and working memory functions involved in the integration of various contextual elements of an experience with its content.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectSource Memoryen_US
dc.subjectAgingen_US
dc.subjectFrontal Lobesen_US
dc.subjectRepeated-Measures Designen_US
dc.subjectMultipleen_US
dc.subjectRedundant Sourcesen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGlisky, Elizabeth Len_US
dc.contributor.chairGlisky, Elizabeth Len_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPan Petten, Cymaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRyan, Leeen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1835en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659746381en_US
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